​​Current Update

Sunday, January 22, 2017, at 3:20 p.m.

We are monitoring a severe weather system that will affect us throughout the rest of the day (today, Sunday, January 22). The National Weather Service has placed northeast Florida under a Potentially Dangerous Situation Tornado Watch through 8:00 p.m. today. This means conditions in the area are ripe for strong tornadic development.

A tornado watch means that authorities are watching severe weather conditions for possible funnels. A tornado warning, if one is issued, means a tornado has been sighted in the area, and you should take shelter immediately. Campus Security is monitoring the NOAA Weather Radio and will:

  • Provide notifications and activating alerts for approaching severe weather.
  • Patrol campus, urging everyone to stay indoors.
  • Coordinating with other personnel to:
    • Recall staff working in exposed areas across campus.
    • Secure loose gear, inspect and secure buildings.
    • Inspect campus after storm to assess damage.

We ask students to please stay indoors and to think now about where they will take shelter if/when an alarm sounds. If a tornado warning is issued, students should:

  • Seek shelter indoors, preferably an interior hallway or lower floor.
  • Avoid seeking shelter in the gymnasium.
  • Avoid windows and doors, taking shelter under heavy furniture, if available.
  • Avoid driving or walking through standing water.
  • If outdoors, find shelter in a ditch or depression.
  • Report any injuries, damage, and/or flooding to Campus Security at (904) 256-7585.

At some points this afternoon, the sun may come out for a brief time. Please do not take this as a sign that it is safe to go outdoors. The National Weather Service suggests that the storms moving through the area will move very quickly, and conditions may deteriorate unexpectedly.

Please exercise caution throughout the afternoon and evening, and watch your email and our social media channels for updates. Stay safe, Dolphins!


​​​​Past Updates

Saturday, October 8, 2016, at 12:00 p.m.

Update at 2:30 p.m.: Water has been restored to campus.

Changes Since Last Update

We are no longer under any watches or warnings. Throughout the day, we will see winds decrease. The St. Johns River is very full, and, based on tidal activity, some areas of campus may continue to see flooding throughout the next week.

On Campus

We are happy to report that we have come through Hurricane Matthew, and Jacksonville University has weathered the storm remarkably well.

Our Oak and Botts halls, where students and essential support staff waited out the storm, never lost power, and all meals were served throughout the entire event without interruption.

There is a current water outage across campus affecting our sewage lift station as a result of a city power outage in the area, as well as from a tree hitting one of our backup generators. Jacksonville Electric Authority is working with JU now to resolve their and our situation as soon as possible.

In the meantime, this outage will cause some inconvenience to our students until it is resolved. Drinking water is not affected, and we have plenty on hand for everyone on site. In addition, meals will continue to be served at Oak Hall until further notice.

We have inspected North Hall and The Village Apartments. There is no damage, but they remain without power and water. Students will be permitted to return to North and the apartments with that understanding. They are welcome to continue to stay at Oak Hall until power is restored. They will return to Oak for meals until further notice.

Campus Map - Routes to take on campus during Matthew clean-upStudents are prohibited, however, from crossing through central campus to get to North and Villages due to the danger from falling limbs and trees. They should use River Road along Dolphin Green, or they can use University Oaks in front of the Gooding and Howard buildings, to the traffic circle, where they can diverge to the apartments and North Hall.

We do have some trees and limbs down across campus, but no major building damage. In addition, no injuries have been reported. Cleanup will begin at 6 a.m. Sunday.

Classes will resume Tuesday, unless circumstances require us to change that schedule. Students should check their JU email accounts for updates on this, as well as for specific logistical information about campus operations to come from Student Life.

Thank you all for your patience and support, and thanks as well to our wonderful Student Life, Dining Services and Campus Security staff for their outstanding work keeping our students safe, fed (and entertained) during the storm.

Communication

For continued updates, please check our Facebook, Twitter, and the website. If you have questions, please refer to the Frequently Asked Questions.

Anticipated Hazards & Safety Tips

Remember basic flood safety:​

  • Do not walk or drive across flood waters.
  • Avoid recreational contact with flood waters.
  • Stay away from flood waters. If you come upon a flowing stream where water is above your ankles, stop, turn around and go another way. Six inches of swiftly moving water can sweep you off of your feet.
  • If you come upon a flooded road while driving, turn around and go another way. Most cars ​can be swept away by less than two feet of moving water.​​
  • Use special caution at night because flood danger is more difficult to recognize in darkness.

There is also a rip current advisory is in effect along the coast. If you had plans to visit the beach over the weekend, please stay out of the water.

Friday, October 7, 2016, at 5:30 p.m.

Changes since the last update

Hurricane Matthew is now a category 2 storm with sustained winds of 110mph. The eye of the storm is about 40 miles due east of Jacksonville, just off our coast.

We are cautiously optimistic that, within the next hour or so, conditions here will begin to improve. That does not mean that we will all be returning to normal operations tonight; we will continue to experience rain and wind through Friday night and early Saturday morning. It does mean that we are almost through the worst of this storm.

On CampusThe dinner setup

Students are safe in Oak and Botts Halls. They’re having chicken, potatoes, and broccoli for dinner tonight. Watch Facebook for photos and updates from the residence halls.

Friday, October 7, 2016, at 9:30 a.m.

Changes since the last update

As of the 8:00 a.m. update, the center of Hurricane Matthew is 100 miles away from Jacksonville. We expect conditions here to worsen throughout the day, with the most severe rain and winds between noon and midnight.

The storm is now a category 3, with sustained winds of 120mph. The expected track of the storm has shifted slightly to the east, and we are cautiously optimistic that the worst of the hurricane -- the winds and rain that form the eye wall -- will remain just off the coast.

We are still facing several hours of very severe weather, so it is important that we continue to remain alert and exercise caution. Still, we’ll take any small fortune with this storm.

Thursday, October 6, 2016, at 3:15 p.m.

Changes since the last update

Hurricane Matthew is moving northwest at 14 mph. The National Weather Service expects it to turn more to the north tonight (Thursday night) or early Friday morning. Although some strengthening is possible prior to landfall, it will likely remain a category 4. The most recent maps show the storm possibly making landfall between West Palm Beach and Port St. Lucie late tonight.

The storm surge threat at the beach continues to worsen. It may seem like an entertaining idea to go to the beach and watch the storm roll in, but the beach is the worst possible place to be in this storm. The forecast includes 7’-11’ storm surge above ground level at the beach and 6’-9’ storm surge above ground level from the St. Johns River, with the additional threat of large wave action on top of those tides. This is why the residents of the beaches were ordered to evacuate.

Please exercise every caution, especially today and tomorrow. Keep your devices charged while the power is on, and stay indoors.

Thursday, October 6, 2016, at 12:30 p.m.

We are receiving some reports that folks have heard on media that Jacksonville University is evacuating the campus. This is false. We have relocated all on-campus students who have not left campus by their own choice to our Oak Hall and Botts Hall residence halls, to ensure maximum safety and a smooth sheltering operation.

We are NOT mandating any evacuation from campus, as these residence halls are not in an evacuation zone. We at JU are urging our students to stay on campus during the storm, and we are informing our off-campus students that they may ride out the storm safely in our Oak and Botts halls.

Thursday, October 6, 2016, at 9:00 a.m.

Changes since the last update

As of the 11:00 p.m. advisory by the National Weather Service last night (Wednesday), we are under a Hurricane Warning. A warning means that the threat is imminent (effects will begin being felt within 24 hours) or occurring now.

Hurricane Matthew is currently a category 3 storm (sustained winds of 125 mph), but is forecast to strengthen back to a category 4 (sustained winds of 130 mph or more) today.

The center (eye) of Hurricane Matthew is about 500 miles southeast of Mayport. Hurricanes can be several hundred miles in diameter including outer bands, and the effects of the system can often be felt hours and even days before hurricane conditions begin.

We are also under a Flood Watch as a result of the Nor’easter that’s moved through the area over the last couple of days, and all that rainfall will make our flood-prone areas even moreso.

Weather

Based on the most recent predictions of the National Weather Service, we are expecting bands of heavy rain and intense gusts to increase throughout the day, beginning late this morning. These will be very much like strong the strong tropical thunderstorms we experience on a regular basis but throughout the day will begin to intensify. Between the bands could be relative calm, however, you should use caution if heading out doors.

Tomorrow, we will likely begin to experience hurricane conditions in the afternoon and evening, where we will begin to experience sustained high winds with higher gusts as the bands consolidate.

In total, the National Weather Service expects we will experience heavy rain, damaging winds, localized flooding, and high storm tide.

Evacuations

Evacuation orders have been issued for Jacksonville Beach and zones A, B, and C (zone map available here). Jacksonville University is not in an evacuation zone, because much of our campus -- especially Oak and Botts Halls -- is on high ground. We have resources and infrastructure that make our campus one of the safest places our students and residential staff can be, including generators for food storage and plumbing, stores of food to get us through several days, backup water, active campus security, and on-duty physical plant staff for emergencies.

Traditional undergraduate students living off-campus may make arrangements with Campus Security (904-256-7585) to seek shelter on campus.

We strongly encourage everyone who is still on campus to stay put. We know that this storm is frightening, and we cannot stop anyone who wants to leave. It is important to understand, though, that road conditions will deteriorate quickly today, and highways are already so busy that Highway Patrol is struggling to reach all of the accidents that have also occurred. There are no plans as of yet to reverse flow of traffic for evacuation, which will also contribute to busier than normal roadways. It is also very possible that Jacksonville bridges will close without warning and for an unknown span of time. At this point, leaving campus could be more dangerous than staying put and hunkering down.

If you choose to leave, it is very important to have a specific destination in mind and confirmed plans in place for arrival. Hotels and roads will be full and you cannot expect to have a room without a reservation. If you are traveling to friends or family - be sure they know you are coming and have not themselves evacuated. Some gas stations have also been running out of fuel, which could create an even more dangerous situation if you run out of gas along the way. It is imperative that you check out before leaving so the University knows where you are going and has current contact information for you.

Communication

Make sure your phone is charged, as we will be communicating with you by email, social media, and the website throughout the storm. Emergency alerts will be sent via text.

Wednesday, October 5, 2016, at 11:00 a.m.

As of the 5:00 a.m. advisory by the National Weather Service, we are under a Hurricane Watch, which means we are about 36 hours out from the probable onset of hurricane-force weather.

Today and tomorrow, we can expect to experience increasing winds and waves of rain, with heavy bands beginning by around 11:00 a.m. Thursday. We will likely begin to experience tropical storm conditions during the night Thursday and into Friday morning. Hurricane conditions are possible Friday afternoon and evening.

In total, the National Weather Service expects we will experience heavy rain, damaging winds, localized flooding, and high storm tide.

Classes, Student Activities, Homecoming & Family Weekend

In the interest of safety, and to allow for sufficient storm preparation, we are cancelling all University activities as of 3:00 p.m. today (Wednesday) through Sunday, including classes, sporting events, Admissions Open House, and Homecoming & Family Weekend.

Next Update

More information about campus preparations will be available throughout the day today in emails to our students, parents, faculty, and staff. The next web update will be available by 9:00 a.m. Thursday.

Tuesday, October 4, 2016, at 9:30 a.m.

Over the last few days, the Jacksonville University Emergency Readiness Team has been watching Hurricane Matthew very closely. As of the 6:10 a.m. update, the cone of uncertainty depicting the potential path of the storm’s center has shifted westward, indicating a higher risk of impact for us here in Jacksonville.

The latest forecast suggests that we may experience tropical storm conditions Thursday night through early Saturday. If the path of the storm shifts farther west, we would likely experience greater impact.

University leadership will make a decision by 5:00 p.m. EDT Wednesday about whether to cancel any classes or on-campus activities, including Homecoming & Family Weekend.

Individual professors may choose to cancel their own classes, but any university-wide closures will be announced by email, text message and social media, and at http://www.ju.edu/weather.

Regarding Homecoming & Family Weekend, we are currently making plans to move many of the outdoor events into indoor venues. If you are registered to attend Homecoming & Family Weekend, you can expect further, more detailed updates from the Office of Alumni by 5:00 p.m. EDT Wednesday.

We strongly recommend that our students and visitors to campus this week avoid water recreation. This is especially important at the beach, where rough surf and dangerous rip currents will certainly be a threat. Please, if you plan to go to the beach, stay out of the water, both for your safety and for the safety of the emergency responders. Powerful waves and rip currents can be a grave danger even to the most experienced swimmers.

To be clear, we are expecting rainy, windy conditions today and tomorrow as a high pressure system from the north begins to clash with Hurricane Matthew. The inclement weather we experience today and tomorrow is not part of the hurricane, but that does not diminish the need for our campus community to exercise caution while moving around campus.

We are monitoring the storm and will send further updates through email, social media, the website and text messages. If you're living on campus, your RA will be another way we communicate with you.

Saturday, October 1, 2016, at 11:30 a.m.

Jacksonville University's Emergency Readiness Team has been monitoring Hurricane Matthew in the Caribbean. Right now, the storm is classified as a category 4 by the National Hurricane Center.

At this time, the forecast takes Matthew through Jamaica Sunday night and Monday, then farther north. Please note that the storm does not pose an immediate threat to us; however, it is important to note the projected path as it pertains to us here in Jacksonville could change dramatically — and many times — between now and the middle of next week. Given the size of the storm, we could experience inclement weather from the outermost bands of Matthew as early as Tuesday.

We will be closely monitoring the storm's progress throughout the coming days, and we will post updates as new information regarding the storm's impact on us becomes available.

In the event of an emergency, notifications and alerts will be broadcast immediately via a combination of any of the following communication channels:

Wednesday, September 14, 2016, at 10:30 a.m.

Throughout the day yesterday, we experienced heavy rain as a tropical disturbance moved into the area from the south. Tropical disturbances and low pressure systems are not unusual; we sometimes experience these waves of intense rain, especially in late summer.

Last night, however, the system strengthened into Tropical Storm Julia. Enough of the circulation remained over the Atlantic Ocean that it was able to gain strength even as we experienced rain and some strong gusts of wind. This is a first for Florida since the advent of meteorological record-keeping: prior to TS Julia, no tropical storm had ever formed over land in Florida.

A Tropical Storm Warning was enacted at around 10:30 p.m. and was removed for us here in Duval County during the early morning hours as the system moved further into Georgia. We never lost power, and no damage has been reported on campus. This system just brought some much-needed rain and a bit of wind.

Today, we can plan to experience a little more rain from the small bands trailing behind TS Julia. We do advise students to stay out of the ocean for the next few days, as rip currents are always an issue when a tropical system moves through the area.

This will be our only update about TS Julia. The Emergency Readiness Team will continue to monitor the weather systems that affect our area. Should we have a weather readiness alert in the future, we will update this page and notify the JU community through the typical channels, such as email, Facebook, and Twitter.

Tuesday, September 6, 2016, at 10:00 a.m.

​At this time, we are no longer under any threat from Post-Tropical Cyclone Hermine. The system moved out of our area over the weekend, and it is now located about 95 miles south of Long Island.

We would like to thank our students, faculty, and staff for their cooperation throughout this event. We were very fortunate here at Jacksonville University, and we are thinking of our friends and colleagues throughout the southeast who experienced damage and losses as a result of the storm.

This will be our last update about Hermine. Should we have a weather readiness alert in the future, we will update this page and notify the JU community through the typical channels, such as email, Facebook, and Twitter.

Friday, September 2, 2016, at 9:00 a.m.

Hurricane Hermine made landfall at 1:30 a.m. in the panhandle of Florida, south of Tallahassee. The system has weakened to a tropical storm during the night and will move out of the area throughout the day today.

We experienced a great deal of rain and wind during the night, but we did not lose power at any point. Around campus, we have some debris littering the ground, including a few large branches, but nothing blocking roadways.

Severe weather will become increasingly intermittent as the day goes on, but please continue to exercise caution.

The tornado watch for our area expired, which means the threat of tornadoes is decreasing, but tornadoes are still a risk as this system continues to move through the area.

We expect rain and wind to continue. The trailing bands of this storm will be our primary concern today, and they can contain some particularly gusty storms. Stay indoors today, and please make every effort to stay off the roads. Throughout the city, there are lots of traffic lights out, and some areas have trees or power lines down.

Campus will reopen for normal business on Saturday, September 3, at 8:00 a.m. We will continue to monitor this system throughout the day.

Be sure to follow us on Facebook and Twitter for real-time updates.

Thursday, September 1, 2016, at 3:50 p.m.

Hurricane Hermine has continued to strengthen and shift over the last several hours; the storm was just upgraded to a category 1 hurricane by the National Weather Service. We are still not expecting a direct hit, but we are likely to experience heavy rains, powerful winds, localized flooding, and an increased risk of tornadoes throughout the night Thursday and well into the day on Friday.

Because the forecast for tomorrow has become more intense, the Emergency Readiness Team and university leadership are cancelling classes and activities for Friday. Athletic events on Friday will follow normal weather protocols.

Please exercise caution as Hurricane Hermine moves through the area and in the day or two that follow. Rain may become intermittent as the storm moves out of the area later in the day Friday, but bands of severe weather, wind gusts, and the potential for tornadoes can still pose great risks very quickly. Stay indoors as much as possible. Remember to fully charge your cell phone now in case of a power outage.

Campus will reopen for normal operations on Saturday at 8:00 a.m. Classes and activities on Saturday will proceed without interruption.

Wednesday, August 31, 2016, at 6:30 p.m.

In the last few hours, Tropical Depression 9 strengthened into Tropical Storm Hermine. Her track also shifted so that we are no longer expecting a direct impact; instead, the center of the storm is forecast to pass north of us.

We are still expecting to feel the effects of the storm, though, including intermittent and possibly heavy rains, strong winds, localized flooding, and the potential for tornadoes.

For the safety of our JU community, we are cancelling classes and activities after 3:30 p.m. on Thursday. We want to ensure that our commuting students and employees have the opportunity to get off the roads before dark and before any possible bridge closures.

On campus, dining will remain open as usual, though students are encouraged to stay indoors as much as possible and to exercise caution when moving between buildings, especially after dark.

Unless something in the forecast changes dramatically, we expect the university to be open for business as usual at 8:00 a.m. on Friday. We will, of course, continue to monitor Hermine closely. If this system undergoes any unusual developments in the next several hours, we will alert the campus community to any changes with as much notice as possible.

Wednesday, August 31, 2016, at 9:45 a.m.

As of the 8:00 a.m. update by the National Weather Service, Tropical Depression 9 is still a tropical depression, but it is expected to strengthen into a tropical storm sometime today.

There has been a slight north- and westward shift in the track of the storm, which indicates we may be at a smaller risk for strong winds, but a greater risk for heavy rains and, potentially, tornadoes.

At this time, we are expecting rain to increase as the storm nears. The greatest impact will likely be Thursday night and into Friday morning.

We are still preparing for potential isolated power outages, localized flooding, isolated severe thunderstorms and/or tornadoes, sustained winds of 35-45​ mph and wind gusts as high as 50-60 mph. Flooding, especially, is likely to be a concern for us, particularly the west side of campus along River Road and the Dolphin Green.

We will continue to monitor this system, and we will post additional information and updates to this page and to our social media channels. Be sure to follow us on Facebook and Twitter for real-time updates.

Tuesday, August 30, 2016, at 3:15 p.m.

Jacksonville University's Emergency Readiness Team continues to monitor Tropical Depression 9. According to the National Hurricane Center, the projected path of the storm takes it across the Florida peninsula and across Duval County and the Northeast Florida-Southeast Georgia region.​ TD9 is expected to produce several inches of rain, gusty winds and isolated tornadoes across our area on Thursday and into Friday, according to the National Weather Service Jacksonville Forecast Office​.

This system is expected to strengthen and become a tropical storm sometime today. We are not under any watches or warnings yet, but we expect to be put under a watch within the next 24 hours.

We are preparing for potential isolated power outages, localized flooding, isolated severe thunderstorms and/or tornadoes, sustained winds of 35-45​ mph and wind gusts as high as 50-60 mph. Flooding, especially, is likely to be a concern for us, particularly the west side of campus along River Road and the Dolphin Green.

Monday, August 29, 2016, at 9:40 a.m.

Jacksonville University's Emergency Readiness Team has been monitoring a developing system in the Gulf of Mexico. The National Hurricane Center upgraded the system to Tropical Depression 9 on Sunday and expects it to turn towards the Gulf Coast of Florida on Wednesday. The projected path of the storm takes it across the Florida peninsula, which means we'll likely be impacted.​

At this time, we can expect chances of rain to increase throughout the week, with the potential for more persistent, widespread rainy conditions on Thursday and into Friday. The storm does not pose an immediate threat to us, but it could within a few days, so we will be closely monitoring its progress.

We are preparing for potential isolated power outages, localized minimal flooding, isolated severe thunderstorms, and possible strong gusts. In the event that Tropical Depression 9 heads our way, we encourage everyone on campus to exercise caution and remain indoors to avoid the possibility of falling limbs or lightning. Flooding, especially, is likely to be a concern for us.​

If you head to the beach during this first week of the fall semester, please exercise caution in and around the water, where rip currents are forecast to be stronger than usual.

In the event of an emergency, notifications and alerts will be broadcast immediately via a combination of any of the following communication channels:

​Tuesday, June 7, 2016, at 9:15​​ a​.m.

​As of the 8:00 advisory from the National Hurricane Center, we are no longer under a Tropical Storm Warning. Tropical Storm Colin has moved into the Atlantic and will deliver rain and wind to the Carolinas until moving further offshore and dissipating later today.

This will be our last update about Colin. Should we have a weather readiness alert in the future, we will update this page and notify the JU community through the typical channels, such as email, Facebook, and Twitter.

Monday, June 6, 2016, at 8:45​​ p.m.

​Tropical Storm Colin continues to head northeast and is expected to move onshore in the Florida Big Bend area (the Gulf Coast of Florida between Crystal River and Fish Creek) in the next few hours. The storm will cross the Florida peninsula through north Florida and southeastern Georgia Tuesday morning.

According to the latest advisory from the National Hurricane Center, "it's ​important to note that the strongest winds and heaviest rains are well removed from the center." This means that much of the significant weather will pass through the area during Monday night/Tuesday morning.​

Please continue to monitor email, social media, and this site for updates. In the event of an emergency, such as an imminent tornado threat, you will hear the audible siren on campus and receive a text ale​rt.​​

We encourage you to stay indoors and to be familiar with storm safety. Please report any accidents, injuries, damages, or excessive water to Campus Security at (904) 256‐7585.

Monday, June 6, 2016, at 3:10​ p.m.

Due to the high likelihood of inclement weather coming through Arlington as a result of Tropical Storm Colin, President Cost and the JU Emergency Preparedness Team have made the decision to cancel all classes for the remainder of Monday and release all nonessential staff by 3:00 p.m. or as soon as practicable.

Campus will resume normal activity at 8:00 a.m. Tuesday morning.

Monday, June 6, 2016, at 11:1​5 a.m.

Jacksonville University's Emergency Readiness Team continues to monitor Tropical Storm Colin. According to the National Hurricane Center, the projected path of the storm takes it across the Florida peninsula and across Duval County and the Northeast Florida-Southeast Georgia region.​ Colin is expected to produce several inches of rain, gusty winds and isolated tornadoes across the First Coast on Monday and into Tuesday morning, according to the National Weather Service Jacksonville Forecast Office​. This remains a fast-moving storm, and conditions will substantially improve by Tuesday afternoon. Widespread and heavier rain will move across the area this afternoon and tonight.

Please check your email, texts and JU social media for updates related to the possibility of class cancellations. Classes today will continue as scheduled, with a decision on evening class cancellations expected to be announced by 5:00 p.m.

Colin's maximum sustained winds this morning had increased to near 50 mph (85 kph), with some slow strengthening possible during the next two days. The highest winds are expected along the coast. The storm was centered about 285 miles west-southwest of Tampa, (455 km) and moving north-northeast at about 16 mph (26 kph), with a turn to the northeast and an increase in speed expected this afternoon. Tropical storm winds extend out to 230 miles, mainly to the east of the center.

The center of Colin was expected to make landfall along the coast of the Florida “Big Bend” area (the Gulf Coast of Florida between Crystal River and Fish Creek) near Monday afternoon or evening. The outer bands of the storm, however, are already being felt in Northeast Florida this morning and are expected to intensify throughout the day.

We are preparing for potential isolated power outages, localized flooding, isolated severe thunderstorms and/or tornadoes, sustained winds of 40​ mph and wind gusts as high as 50-60 mph. We encourage everyone on campus to exercise caution and remain indoors to avoid the possibility of falling limbs or lightning. Flooding, especially, is likely to be a concern for us, particularly the west side of campus along River Road and the Dolphin Green.

​​As you navigate campus over the next couple of days, remember basic flood safety:​

  • Do not walk or drive across flood waters.
  • Avoid recreational contact with flood waters.
  • Stay away from flood waters. If you come upon a flowing stream where water is above your ankles, stop, turn around and go another way. Six inches of swiftly moving water can sweep you off of your feet.
  • If you come upon a flooded road while driving, turn around and go another way. Most cars ​can be swept away by less than two feet of moving water.​​
  • Use special caution at night because flood danger is more difficult to recognize in darkness.

As with any tropical weather, tornadoes are a possibility. In the event of an imminent tornado threat, you will hear the audible siren on campus and receive a text ale​rt. Following that notification, please:

  • Seek shelter inside, in an interior hallway and on the lowest floor of the building.
  • Remain away from windows and doors. If available, take shelter under a desk or a heavy table.
  • Do not seek shelter in the Gymnasium.
  • If outdoors and not near a building​, find shelter in a ditch or depression.
  • Report injury, damage, flooding to Campus Security at (904) 256‐7585.
  • Call 911 for Emergency Response, if necessary.

Sunday, June 5, 2016, at 6:47​ p.m.

Jacksonville University's Emergency Readiness Team has been monitoring a developing system in the Gulf of Mexico. The National Hurricane Center upgraded the system to Tropical Depression 3 this afternoon and expects it to become Tropical Storm Colin before reaching Florida on Monday. The projected path of the storm takes it across the Florida peninsula, which means we'll likely be impacted.​

At this time, we can expect rainy conditions on Monday and into Tuesday morning. This is a fast-moving storm; the National Hurricane Center expects it to move out of the area during the day on Tuesday.

We are preparing for potential isolated power outages, localized minimal flooding, isolated severe thunderstorms, and winds around 20 mph. We encourage everyone on campus to exercise caution and remain indoors to avoid the possibility of falling limbs or lightning. Flooding, especially, is likely to be a concern for us. As you navigate campus over the next couple of days, remember basic flood safety:​

  • Do not walk or drive across flood waters.
  • Avoid recreational contact with flood waters.
  • Stay away from flood waters. If you come upon a flowing stream where water is above your ankles, stop, turn around and go another way. Six inches of swiftly moving water can sweep you off of your feet.
  • If you come upon a flooded road while driving, turn around and go another way. Most cars can be swept away by less than two feet of moving water.​​
  • Use special caution at night because flood danger is more difficult to recognize in darkness.

In the event of an emergency, notifications and alerts will be broadcast immediately via a combination of any of the following communication channels:


​​​​​About this page

Positioned just a few miles from the Atlantic Ocean, Jacksonville University occasionally experiences the effects of tropical weather. In the event of potential tropical weather, the President will activate University’s Weather Preparedness Team. The team closely monitors weather forecast models and communicates with local and regional authorities about precautions which should be taken.

Students, faculty, staff, and concerned parents should monitor this page for updated information in the event of impending tropical weather. The University will post ​updates as available, and as deemed necessary.

For Additional Updates

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