Degree Requirements

Students admitted into the Kinesiological Sciences master’s program must complete core course requirements, required courses in one selected concentration and elective courses that will best prepare students for the next phase of their education or career. A minimum grade of “B-” is required in all graduate courses. Any course in which a student receives a grade lower than a “B-“ must be successfully repeated in the next term that the course is offered. Failure to successfully complete a repeated course will result in academic dismissal from the program.

All MSKS students must successfully complete 32 to 35 credit hours to be eligible for earning the Masters degree. Students may take additional graduate Kinesiology courses, if they so choose. 

Students must complete the following:

  • Graduate Kinesiology Core
  • Two courses in the selected concentration
  • A culminating project or a thesis that aligns with the concentration.

Core Requirements 23 Credits

  • KIN 505 Advanced Human Anatomy (3)
    • Provides students with an advanced integrative understanding of human anatomy. A regional approach will be used to learn typical and atypical anatomical structures of the human body. Clinical correlations and applications are made throughout each topical area.
  • KIN 505L Advanced Human Anatomy Lab (1)
    • Provides students with an advanced integrative understanding of human anatomy. A regional approach will be used to learn typical and atypical anatomical structures of the human body. Clinical correlations and applications will made throughout each topical area.
  • KIN 506 Journal Seminar I (1)
    • Designed to introduce and scientific articles. The course will enhance a student’s ability to understand research, terminology and study design for basic and physiological sciences. We will assess strengths and limitations of each paper.

  • KIN 507 Journal Seminar II (1)
    • Designed to present and discuss novel, forward-thinking, and relevant scientific articles. The course will enhance a student’s ability to understand research, terminology and study design for basic and physiological sciences. We will assess strengths and limitations of each paper.
  • KIN 522 Research Methods (3)
    • Examination and evaluation of the scientific method and research-based development for Kinesiology sciences. Students are taught to: identify research question(s) and independent and dependent variables; determine analyses performed and if each analysis supports the hypothesis, and if the author’s conclusions are supported by the results from the study. Includes reading, interpreting, and presenting kinesiology research abstracts to peers in class. A research poster (ACSM format) is also created and presented.
  • KIN 525 Motor Control (3)
    • Neurophysiological and neuromuscular basis of human movement. Topics include principles of neuromuscular motor physiology and sensory feedback that influence movement outcomes. The course culminates in didactic and applied approaches to understanding the integration of the underlying two systems which result in movement behavior. Culminates in written research report.
  • KIN 525L Motor Control Lab (1)
    • Application of theories and practices of motor control assessment. Selected activities that demonstrate neurophysiological and neuromechanical principles will be used to explore and demonstrate application of didactic principles. Applicable project-based course. Two hours laboratory every two weeks.
  • KIN 538 Exercise Physiology (3)
    • Topics associated with the metabolic and physiological aspects of human movement are covered. Specific interest in the physiology of movement associated with elite-level performance will be discussed.
  • KIN 542 Statistics for Kinesiology (3)
    • Graduate level introduction to statistical concepts and techniques and their applications to kinesiology-related fields. Topics include descriptive and inferential statistical tools to analyze parametric and non-parametric data. Statistical analyses and interpretations are related to applications in kinesiology. Uses EXCEL and SPSS software (which are available for free on University computers). Applicable project-based course.

  • KIN 585 Advanced Biomechanics of Human Movement (3)
    • This course will develop advanced knowledge in “cutting-edge” biomechanical methods and technologies used in research and application in sport, exercise, and clinical environments. Video analysis is studied extensively. In a laboratory setting, students collect and analyze novel data using Dartfish software to learn how to optimize the process. Students learn how to identify and analyze critical instants and phases of movement. Recent research on force plates, motion analysis cameras, and marker sets is then critically analyzed so the student gains an in-depth understanding of a complete biomechanical motion analysis process.
  • KIN 585L Advanced Biomechanics of Human Movement Lab (1)
    • Biomechanical Analysis of Human Movement Lab (1) Laboratory experiences focus on passive and active muscle and joint biomechanics, sports biomechanics, running video and kinematic analysis, EMG analysis, and force plate analysis. We explore qualitative and quantitative analyses that can be used to study the human body and human movement. Attention is continually focused on performance, injury, and health.

Available Concentrations

Health and Wellness Concentration (complete minimum of 6 credits)

  • KIN 527 Nutrition for Physical Activity and Health (3 cr)
    • Introduction to the study of nutrition for physical activity and health. Topics include but not are limited to exercise- focused macronutrient metabolism, vitamins and minerals, and how diet affects and can be used to optimize health and physical activity. Emphasis on nutritional concepts related to the energy utilization in exercise and recovery and selected topics about relationships habitual diet affects general health, body composition, performance, and recovery.
  • KIN 530 Exercise is Medicine (3 cr)
    • Focus on the global Exercise is Medicine initiatives. In addition, the current Healthy People and Healthy Campus initiatives will be discussed, as well as general health promotion initiatives, highlighting Jacksonville University, national, and global health initiatives.
  • KIN 560 Exercise Modification and Progressions for Selected Populations (3 cr)
    • Focus on modifications necessary for those with special needs due to a variety of chronic diseases, musculoskeletal disorders and abilities.

Non-Thesis Option

Non-thesis option will also complete an approved project supervised by Kinesiology faculty: KIN 596 Health & Wellness Project (3).

Thesis option

Thesis option will also complete an approved thesis supervised by Kinesiology faculty to prepare them for future doctoral study: KIN 599 Thesis (var. 3-9).

Human Performance Concentration (complete minimum of 6 credits)

  • KIN 529 Ergogenic Aids (3 cr)
    • Ergogenic Aids for Human Health and Performance (3) Focus on the metabolism, scientific evidence, practical application of ergogenic aids for human health and performance.
  • KIN 540 Fitness Assessment and Exercise Prescription (3 cr)
    • Examination of basic assessment of the five health-related components of fitness. Course topics include review and practice of assessments for muscular strength and endurance; flexibility, body composition and cardiovascular fitness. An analysis of the relationship between physical fitness and degenerative diseases; the role of exercise in a wellness lifestyle; and methods of evaluating and prescribing physical fitness activities.

  • KIN 550 Resistance Training: Principles and Practices (3 cr)
    • This course examines the theories and principles associated with resistance training and how to apply these theories and principles to the training of clients. Course topics examine the range of skills and knowledge required to successfully assess, design, and instruct individuals in aspects specific to the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA). After completing this course students will be prepared to sit for the NSCA certification exam or strength and conditioning specialists (CSCS).
  • KIN 568 Sport and Performance Psychology (3 cr)
    • Examination of the connection between the theory of sport and performance and dynamic challenges of the practice of applied sport and performance psychology. Topics include personality, assessment, motivation, emotion, attention, self- confidence, mental imagery, ethics, the injured and over-trained athlete, perfectionism, talent development, and group dynamics, along with the psychological characteristics of elite athletes. The role of the Sport and Performance Psychologist as part of a performance enhancement team will also be addressed along with appropriate referral strategies.
  • KIN 575 Movement Performance Analytics (3 cr)
    • This course will cover in detail topics associated with modern technology and training in preventing injuries, detecting early warning signs of fatigue and failure and improving overall performance to help keep athletes on the field perform at elite levels for a longer period of time.
  • KIN 583 Tissue Biomechanics (3 cr)
    • Application of mechanical principles to biological systems to better understand the physical properties of bones, ligaments, tendons, muscles, cartilage,= and vascular tissues. The physical properties of stress, strain, sheer, torsion and bending on various tissues are examined.
  • KIN 596: Health and Wellness Project (3)

    • The capstone experience for non-thesis students. Non-thesis students in the Health and Wellness Concentration will have the option to complete a one-semester, project designed to unify an assimilate the students didactic and applied experiences. The Project will culminate with submission of written summary and verbal presentation. These required assignments will consist of the synthesis of selected topic(s) within kinesiology. The student will critically review research within selected kinesiology area(s) that will be integrated into presentations and written paper(s). Students will actively participate in creating, synthesizing, presenting, and sharing knowledge.

  • KIN 597 Human Performance Project (3 cr)
    • The capstone experience for non-thesis students. Non-thesis students in the Human Performance Concentration will have the option to complete a one-semester, project designed to unify an assimilate the students didactic and applied experiences. The Project will culminate with submission of written summary and verbal presentation. These required assignments will consist of the synthesis of selected topic(s) within kinesiology. The student will critically review research within selected kinesiology area(s) that will be integrated into presentations and written paper(s). Students will actively participate in creating, synthesizing, presenting, and sharing knowledge.

Non-thesis option

Non-thesis option will also complete an approved project supervised by Kinesiology faculty: KIN 597 Human Performance Project (3).

Thesis option

Thesis option will also complete an approved thesis supervised by Kinesiology faculty to prepare them for future doctoral study: KIN 599 Thesis (var. 3-9).

Elective Courses

  • KIN 500 Topics in Kinesiological Sciences (var. 1-6 cr: max. 12)
    • Three hours lecture per week. A study of selected topics of major interest in Kinesiology not covered in other course offerings. The topic for the semester will be indicated in advance. The course may be repeated with different topics.
  • KIN 508 Kinematic and Kinetic Analysis of Human Movement (3)
    • Familiarizes students with "hot topics" in the kinematics and kinetics research literature. Many important topics will be introduced including clinical measures, sport, gait and running, fatigue, wearable technology, peak performance, strength training, balance, general health, and elderly populations.
  • KIN 514 Metabolism & Composition (1.5)
  • KIN 586 Advanced Neuromechanics of Sport Performance (3)
  • KIN 587/588 Independent Study in Kinesiological Sciences (var. 1-6; max. 6)
  • KIN 590 Internship in the Kinesiological Sciences (var. 1-9; max. 9)