Course Descriptions

KIN 500 Topics in Kinesiological Sciences (var. 1-6 cr: max. 12)
Three hours lecture per week.  A study of selected topics of major interest in Kinesiology not covered in other course offerings.  The topic for the semester will be indicated in advance. The course may be repeated with different topics. 

KIN 501 Biomechanics of Human Movement (1.5 cr)
Three hours lecture per week. The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with “hot topics” in two areas of kinesiology: biomechanics and physiology. Many important topics will be introduced including sport, running, fitness guidelines, peak performance, strength training, general health, and elderly populations. This will be an active learning environment with students regularly discussing and presenting research literature and trends in society. 

KIN 502 Muscle/Tissue Mechanics (1.5 cr)
Three hours lecture per week. This course will cover a wide range of topics related to all aspects of skeletal muscle form and function. The emphasis of this course will be on the mechanical properties of skeletal muscle, and translational aspects of basic science research.

KIN 503 Sensorimotor Control (1.5 cr)
Three hours lecture per week. Discussion is provided on the physiological, psychological, and ecological influences on movement and motor skill learning. Dynamical systems theory and the ecological perspective on perception-action coupling for information-movement paradigms are covered as well as the scope of neurophysiological and neuromuscular foundations for motor control. 

KIN 504 Physiology of Human Movement (1.5 cr)
Three hours lecture per week. This course examines the physiological basis of human movement.  Course topics include the advanced principles of exercise metabolism; the body’s adaptation to training; and the role of physical activity in promoting health and preventing disease.

KIN 511 2-Dimensional Video Analysis (1.5 cr)
Three hours lab per week. The purpose of this course is to develop expertise in 2D video analysis of athletes. Students will film athletes, process videos using Dartfish software, analyzing videos for coaching/performance, analyze videos for research, and conduct biomechanical analyses of critical instants and phases of athletic movements. The course will consist primarily of field work, laboratories, and tutorials. 

KIN 512 3-Dimensional Motion Analysis (1.5 cr)
Three hours lab per week. The purpose of this course is to develop expertise in 3D motion-analysis data collection, reduction, and analysis. Students will learn how the Vicon motion-analysis system works and how to use it for clinical, performance, and research purposes. Students will learn the details of biomechanical marker sets, calibration and optimal camera setup, and proper data collection, and how to generate reports and interpret data.

KIN 513 Force Plate & Electromyography (1.5 cr)
Three hours lab per week. The purpose of this course is to develop expertise in force plate and electromyography data collection, analysis, and interpretation. Force plate analysis will focus primarily on protocols used to scientifically assess balance. Emphasis will be on developing expertise with the Neurocom Balance Master force plate and its six protocols. The second half of the course will focus on developing expertise with Delsys wireless EMG data collection and analysis. Students will be trained with the protocols commonly used to assess muscle contraction in clinical and athletic populations. 

KIN 514 Metabolism & Composition (1.5 cr)
Three hours lab per week. The purpose of this course is to develop expertise in important physiological assessments using to assess fitness and athletic performance. Focus is placed on heart rate monitoring and VO2 analysis. Specifically, students will develop expertise in graded treadmill tests used to assess fitness and maximum VO2 and the methods used to assess running economy. Emphasis is also placed on phone apps and running watch devices that can be used to assess physiology and activity. 

KIN 521 Statistical Literacy (3 cr)
Three hours lecture per week. Statistical literacy is the ability to understand statistical language (e.g., statistical words, symbols, and terms) and interpret graphs and tables in scientific papers and media outlets (e.g., news, media, polls). This course will examine how to interpret and present statistical results to both scientific and general populations. Students will develop the skills to interpret and then present data findings in written, figural (graphs, tables, plots), and verbal formats. Students will apply their knowledge through interactive data activities by creating scientific research posters and abstracts. Students will learn to execute three major steps in the data analysis process: (a) identify the appropriate statistical technique for a given research problem; (b) conduct the following data analysis using SPSS® Statistics (a statistical software program used for data management and data analysis): descriptive statistics, one-sample, dependent-samples and independent samples t tests, one-way ANOVA, and correlation; and (c) interpret the statistical values generated by these various analytical tool. 

KIN 522 Research Literacy (3 cr)
Three hours lecture per week. This skill-based course is designed to make the student a confident and efficient reader of the research literature. A process is taught to help the student quickly 1) identify the research question(s), 2) identify the independent and dependent variables from the study, 3) determine the number of analyses performed 4) determine if each analysis supports the hypothesis, and 5) determine if the author’s conclusions are supported by the results from the study. This process is mastered by reading, interpreting, and presenting many kinesiology research abstracts to peers in class. A research poster (ACSM format) is also created and presented; the student chooses a manuscript within the area of kinesiology he/she hopes to gain expertise.

KIN 531 Rehabilitation Research Design Procedures (3 cr)
Three hours lecture per week. This course introduces principles of research design and analysis and provides critical evaluation of research and of evidence-based practice. Cross-listed with CSD 531.

KIN 535 Perception-Action Coupling (3 cr)
Three hours lecture per week. Detailed discussion is provided on the sensorimotor aspects of movement control and perception-action coupling in complex behavioral systems. Emphasis is on information-processing from an ecological perspective and coordinated behavior viewed from the dynamical interactions of the organism, task, and environment. Neurophysiological and neuromuscular aspects of movement control provide the basis for understanding the psychological and ecological behavior patterns associated with skilled motor performance.

KIN 541 Behavioral Medicine (3 cr)
Three hours lecture per week. Behavioral medicine is the application of the specific educational, scientific, and professional contributions of the discipline of psychology to the promotion and maintenance of health; the prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of illness and disability; the identification of etiologic and diagnostic correlates of health, illness, and related disability; and the analysis and improvement of the healthcare system and health policy. Based on the biopsychosocial model, this course examines the basic behavioral medicine concepts and explores how they can be applied to help people who need to change specific lifestyle behaviors to attain better health. Specific behavioral medicine topics will include stress, diet and supplementation, pain, health-related quality of life, sleep, physical activity, sedentary behavior, smoking tobacco, environmental factors (e.g., noise, pollution, climate), and everyday behaviors (hand washing, alcohol use, wearing a seat belt).

KIN 550 Resistance Training Principles & Practice (3 cr)
Three hours lecture per week. This course examines the theories and principles associated with resistance training and how to apply these theories and principles to the training of clients. Course topics examine the range of skills and knowledge required to successfully assess, design, and instruct individuals in aspects specific to the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA). Students will be required to share what they have learned by preparing either a lecture or a webinar for others including undergraduate students preparing for the CSCS certification. A composite of outlines for individual NSCA CSCS textbook chapters is required as a group project. After completing this course students will be prepared to sit for the NSCA certification exam or strength and conditioning specialists (CSCS).

KIN 561 Best Practices in Secondary School Athletic Training (3 cr)
This course dissects best practices in athletic training at the secondary school level.  This is pertinent for students preparing to enter the secondary school athletic training field. This course addresses the areas of knowledge, skills, and values to identify injury and illness risk factors encountered by athletes and others involved in physical activity and to plan and implement a risk management and prevention program. 

KIN 562 Deadly Risks in Sports – Secondary School Best Practices (3 cr)
Prerequisite: KIN 561. This course examines deadly risks associated with best practices in athletic training at the secondary school level.  This is pertinent for students preparing to enter the secondary school athletic training field. This course addresses the areas of knowledge, skills, and values to identify injury and illness risk factors encountered by athletes and others involved in physical activity and to plan and implement a risk management and prevention program.  Emphasis placed on the deadliest risks of sports.

KIN 563 Rehabilitation of Sports Injury within the Secondary School AT Room (3 cr) 
This course challenges the best practices in rehabilitation at the secondary school level.  This is pertinent for students preparing to enter the secondary school athletic training field. This course addresses the areas of knowledge, skills, and values to rehabilitate sports related injuries sustained by athletes and others involved in physical activity and initiate return to play or competition following injury.  Emphasis placed on athletic training room methods.

KIN 564 Funding, Politics, Partnerships & Pitfalls in Secondary School Athletic (3 cr) 
This course introduces marketing and business practices within the secondary school athletic department.  This is relevant course for students preparing to enter the secondary school athletic training field. This course addresses the areas of operations, budget and funding to sustain a dynamic athletic training program. Emphasis placed on getting the job done and meeting your goals.

KIN 565 Injury Reporting, Data Collection & Research in Athletic Training (3 cr) 
This course presents the importance of appropriate injury reporting and data collection for legal and research purposes.  This is applicable course for students preparing to enter the secondary school athletic training field. This course addresses the areas of reporting and Data collection and translates data into reportable figures and goals to substantiate program success and growth. Emphasis placed on setting goals and measuring success.

KIN 566 Essential Competencies in Athletic Training (3 cr) 
This course reviews and dissects the educational competencies of athletic training.  It is a critical course for students pursuing athletic training careers in secondary school settings.  The course focus will be on demonstrating proficiency in these key areas:  evidence based practice, prevention and health promotion, clinical exam and diagnosis, acute care of injury or illness, therapeutic interventions, psychosocial strategies, health care administration, professional development.

KIN 570 Advanced Physiology of Human Movement (3 cr)
Three hours lecture per week. This course will cover in detail topics associated with the metabolic and physiological aspects of human movement. Specific interest in the physiology of movement associated with elite-level performance will be discussed.

KIN 575 Movement Performance Analytics (3 cr)
Three hours lecture per week. This course will cover in detail topics associated with modern technology and training in preventing injuries, detecting early warning signs of fatigue and failure and improving overall performance to help keep athletes on the field perform at elite levels for a longer period of time.

KIN 580 Mechanical Modeling of Human Motion (3 cr)
Three hours lecture per week. Prerequisites: CS 170 or equivalent. This course will serve as an introduction to mechanical modeling of human motion (lectures), along with application of computational software to model and estimate internal tissue responses to physical demand of activities/tasks (laboratory activities). Students are required to obtain a student license for Matlab software. 

KIN 585 Advanced Biomechanical Analysis of Human Movement (3 cr)
Three hours lecture per week. This course will develop advanced knowledge in “cutting-edge” biomechanical methods and technologies used in research and application in sport, exercise, and clinical environments. Video analysis is studied extensively. In a laboratory setting, students collect and analyze novel data using Dartfish software to learn how to optimize the process. Students learn how to identify and analyze critical instants and phases of movement. Recent research on force plates, motion analysis cameras, and marker sets is then critically analyzed so the student gains an in-depth understanding of a complete biomechanical motion analysis process. Focus is placed on the inverse dynamics analysis. Students then study emerging custom biomechanical analyses in the research literature. In a laboratory setting, students learn how to conduct a complete biomechanical flexibility analysis of the shoulder joint using a custom torque-angle analysis. Students will establish a 1) thorough understanding of joint flexibility and 2) how to collect, reduce, analyze, interpret, and present biomechanical data.

KIN 586 Advanced Neuromechanics of Sport Performance (3 cr)
Three hours lecture per week. Topics from neurophysiology and biomechanics are combined to provide a deeper understanding of the mechanisms associated with high-level performance in sport. Special consideration is given to the neuromuscular strategies associated with exceptional movement performance.

KIN 587/588. Independent Study in Kinesiological Sciences (var. 1-6 cr: max. 6 cr)  
Each credit hour requires 45 contact hours in the lab.  Minimum of 18 graduate hours required [with permissions of both Kinesiology Faculty academic advisor and Program Chair].  This course may be taken for credit more than once, but only six hours will count toward satisfying program degree requirements and only six hours will count toward satisfying University graduation requirements. In consultation with a faculty mentor, students will develop a research plan to explore a unique human movement phenomenon. Appropriate activities include, but are not limited to, literature reviews, data collection, and data analysis and manuscript/presentation preparation.  Graded outcomes must include either a review paper, a formal scientific paper and/or a presentation.

KIN 590 Internship in the Kinesiological Sciences (var. 1-6 cr: max 6 cr)
Each credit hour requires 45 contact hours in the field.  Minimum of 30 graduate hours required [with permissions of both Kinesiology Faculty academic advisor and Program Chair].  This course is designed to provide relevant experiential learning in a Movement Sciences setting of the students’ choosing.  The course may be repeated in a different experiential learning capacity.

KIN 599 Thesis (var. 1-6 cr: max 6 cr)
Prerequisite: KIN 531. Each credit hour requires 45 contact hours of research activity. Minimum of 18 graduate hours required [with permissions of both Kinesiology Faculty academic advisor and Program Chair]. The master's thesis provides an opportunity for students to expand their understanding of the complexities of the issues involved in a specific topic within kinesiology. Students work closely with a core KIN faculty member to whom they are assigned, and often with an additional faculty affiliate as well, depending on their interest. Students identify and focus on a topic and conduct a rigorous review and analysis of the relevant theoretical and/or empirical literature. Students are encouraged to choose a topic that draws on their specific interests, past experiences, and/or future professional or academic goals.