Courses

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The Building of JU's Iconic Mascot Sculpture

MFA Visual Arts Courses

ART 501. Graduate Seminar I (3; Su)

This visiting lecture series will meet weekly during the Summer Intensive. The series will include different visiting artists from around the world with a wide perspective on the various approaches to art-making. This course will allow candidates the opportunity to develop and articulate the writing skills necessary for MFA level work, while expanding their exposure to various influences.

 

ART 511. Process Investigation I (4; Su)

This initial course is part of the Summer Intensive and is designed to offer a series of experiences that will help redefine and explore different approaches to artistic processes and to the student's area of study. The focus of the component lies clearly in the physical realm of craftsmanship as artistic-based research.

 

ART 515. Critical Theory (2; F)

Based on a survey of critical theory, this graduate seminar provides a venue for the analysis of texts, issues and discourses that inform contemporary visual culture. Emphasis is placed on examining the role of critical theory in contemporary art, design, criticism and curating.

 

ART 526. Practical Methodology (2; S)

The multi-disciplinary nature of current arts practice suggests that today's artists need to go beyond their particular art form, and understand the issues that confront making and presenting across the arts as a whole. Through a series of lectures including those from practicing artists discussing their work in relation to the tensions of making and presenting and through supporting discussions, related activities, and self directed tasks, this course is designed to broaden the students' understanding of the other arts, and to familiarize them with issues relating to practice. This in turn is intended to help students put their work in a broader arts context, to explore correspondences and differences, and to question their creative practice in light of other arts practices. May be repeated for credit as content changes.

 

ART 530. Intermedia I (3; Su)

This course is part of the Summer Intensive and is a multimedia class that combines training and experimentation in various types of technology. Including but not limited to a working knowledge of JU computer systems including email, Blackboard, Web Advisor, H-drive, and various digital imaging software.

 

ART 536. Interdisciplinary Arts Seminar (1-6, varies; F)

This course emphasizes the essentially collaborative nature of artistic practice. It offers the opportunity to experiment with new kinds of collaborative relationships and to observe, create and discuss the artist's role in the transformation of ideas into collaborative works. Through three intensive collaborative projects, students engage with other artists and artistic practices and/or with various practitioners from other disciplines such as: dancers, scientists, actors, musicians, writers, mathematicians, etc. as a means of realizing their artistic vision. May be repeated for credit as content changes.

 

ART 541. Graduate Critique I (3; Su)

This course is part of the Summer Intensive and examines the interrelationship between the theory and practice and the nature of artistic production as a form of research, while exploring various methods and approaches to critical evaluation of artistic process and product.

 

ART 545. Art History and Criticism (2; F)

This course comprises reading, writing, and discussion of art criticism and cultural commentary, including a survey of 20th Century art and field trips to visit area galleries and museums to view current exhibitions.

 

ART 550. Pedagogy I (3; F/S)

This seminar will focus on contemporary and historical approaches to visual art pedagogy as directly related to discipline's techniques and applications. Focus is on information exchange in the areas of instructional strategies, venue curriculum, venue management, and assessment application.

 

ART 556. Research and Development I (3; F)

This course is a student-devised process in which the exploration of ideas and the use of resources, in preparation for a project, are key elements. It offers students the opportunity to further identify their interests and creative focus, and to develop artistic strategies to explore these concepts in relation to their final work.

 

ART 600. Graduate Seminar II (3; Su)

This visiting artist series will meet weekly during the Summer Intensive. The series will include different visiting artists from around the world with a wide perspective on the various approaches to art-making.

This course will have individual studio visits with MFA candidates to discuss the process of their creative work.

 

ART 611. Process Investigation II (4; Su)

This course is part of the Summer Intensive and combines contemporary theory with practical application to art making and craft. In this applied (studio) course, candidates will attend seminars during the Summer Intensive for discussion and experiential work. Students will focus on ways art practices can influence aesthetics and develop a heighten sense of proprioception.

 

ART 615. Critical Issues (2; S)

This course is intended as a stimulus to art-making and helps to form critical and conceptual foundation for students to bring to their studio practice. Emphasis is placed on examining the role of critical theory in contemporary art, through the instructor's specialization.

 

ART 630. Intermedia II (3; Su)

This course is part of the Summer Intensive and includes advance study and implementation of various types of technology. Including but not limited to a working knowledge of multimedia software and interactive strategies.

 

ART 640. Graduate Critique II (3; Su)

This course is part of the Summer Intensive and uncovers the various modalities and underpinnings inherent in producing, showing and spectating; it serves as an open platform for candidates to create, present, discuss and critique artwork

 

ART 645. Marketcraft (2; F)

This course explores the economics of Art and the Art market both through labor theories and applied approaches to contemporary capital in open markets. Students will gain in depth understanding of global creative economies, while cultivating tangible methods for individual commerce.

 

ART 650. Pedagogy II (3; F/S)

Advanced study of contemporary and historical approaches to art pedagogy as directly related to discipline's techniques and applications. Residency Proposal, Activity Completion, and Assessment

Summary are part of the course requirements.

 

ART 656. Research and Development II (3; S)

This course is a student -devised process in which the exploration of ideas and the use of resources in preparation for the project are key elements. It offers students the opportunity to further identify their interests and creative focus, and to develop artistic strategies to explore these concepts in relation to their final work.

 

ART 665. Graduate Thesis I (4; F)

The project is the culmination of the courses and comprises a significant body of work or works which will be presented in a public place. After agreement regarding your final proposal, you will work independently with the support of your mentor and with technical assistance as negotiated. The project will be a substantial researched work reflecting the depth of study and demonstrating a distinctive artistic voice.

 

ART 675. Graduate Thesis II (4; S)

Continued development and implementation of Research Project and Thesis.

 

ART 676. Special Topics in Art (1-6, varies)

Particular topics or themes in art. May be repeated for credit as content changes.

 

ART 685. Portfolio (2; F)

Extensive body of professional work evaluated by a panel of faculty and artists from the field of Visual

Arts. The portfolio is to include candidate's curriculum vitae and media.

 

ART 695. Graduate Thesis Continuous Enrollment (1)

Prerequisite ART 675. This course is Pass/Fail. May be repeated for credit. Students must enroll in ART

695 each subsequent semester until the completion of the research-based project/thesis. Faculty will periodically review individual student's progress in meeting course goals and completing the project/thesis. Upon completion of the project/thesis, faculty will approve the final paper and arrange for final paper presentation sessions. Students are expected to complete all objectives for ART 675 and finalize their projects for committee approval prior to their presentations.

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