Davis College of Business at Jacksonville University

Academic Programs

Schedule & Course Descriptions




AACSBAACSB Accreditation
The DBA coursework is designed to allow student to continue working full time while attending classes.  Classes are held every other week on Friday afternoons and all day Saturday.  The learning environment is a combination of both onsite classwork and engaging individual work that can be accomplished through online exchanges and collaboration with faculty and colleagues. 

 

Fall 2014 Cohort Class Schedule: Proposed DBA Curriculum and Program of Study

Year One

DBA Orientation- August 16-17, 2014

​​​​​Fall Semester (September - December)​ ​ ​

​Code​

Course​

Credit​

​INB 700

Corporate and Global Strategy​

3​

​MGT 705​​

Intrapreneurship and Entrepreneurial Thought Leadership​

3​

​DSIM 710

Advanced Statistics and Applications​

​3

 

​​​​ ​ ​Spring Semester (January - May)

Co​de

Course​

Credit​

MGT 715

Organizational Development, Transformation and Change

3​

​MGT 720

Advanced Negotiations and Communications​

3​

​DSIM 725

Quantitative Methods for Executive Decision Making​

(Quantitative Business Analytics I)

​3

​MGT 730

DBA Colloquium I​

1​

 

​​ ​ ​Summer Semester (May - June)

Code

Course​

Credit​

​​MGT 735

Contemporary Business Ethics​

3​

 

Sub-Total Credit Hours After Year 1:                                                          

​22

 

Year Two

​​ ​ ​Fall Semester (September - December)

Code

Course​

Credit​

​DSI​M 740

Business Analytics & Technological Tools​​

(Quantitative Business Analytics II)

3​

​INB 745 

Global Business in the Transitional Market Place​

3​

FIN 750

Corporate Mergers, Acquisitions, and Valuations​

​3

 

​ ​ ​Spring Semester (January - May)

Code

Course​

Credit​

DSIM 755​

Advanced Research Methods I​

3​

​ACCT 760 

Advanced Managerial Accounting

3​

​INB 765

Marketing with a Global Mindset

​3

 

​ ​ ​Summer Semester (May - June)

Code

​​Course​

Credit​

ECON 770

Applied Ec​onometrics​

--- Comprehensive ​Exams​

--- Oral Presentation of Dissertation Proposal​

3​

Sub-Total Credit Hours After Year 2: ​

43​

 

Year Three*

​  Fall Semester (September - December) ​

Code

​Course​​

Credit​

DSIM 775

Advanced Research Methods II

4​

​MGT 780

DBA Colloquium II​

1​

 

​ ​ ​Spring Semester (January - May)

Code

​Course​

Credit​

XXX 785

Disserta​tion I/Applied Research  I​                                        

(ACCT, DSIM, ECON, FIN, INB,​ MGT, or MKG)​

6​


​ ​ ​Summer Semester (May - June)

Code

Course​

Credit​

​XXX 790

Dissertation II/Applied Research II​

(ACCT, DSIM, ECON, FIN, INB,​ MGT, or MKG)

6​

​XXX 795

Dissertation Extension (1 credit hour if needed)​

Total Credit Hours Required:

60​

 

​* ACCT, DSIM, ECON, FIN, INB, MGT, MKG 795, Dissertation Extension (1 credit hour if needed) 
* ACCT, DSIM, ECON, FIN, INB, MGT, MKG 800, Special Topics (max. 6 credits)


DBA Course Descriptions

ACCT 760. Advanced Managerial Accounting (3)  In this class students will review financial system basics and various other metrics necessary for an eclectic view of identifying and solving business problems and finding opportunity. In this class students will be introduced to concepts that straddle the accounting/finance/marketing boundary such as feature-set, targeting, and segmentation. The class will move quickly into modeling financial/marketing issues and problem-solving with tools like optimization and simulation. Included will be an introduction to Monte Carlo Simulation using Crystal Ball (Oracle), and VBA for Financial Modeling & Data Analytics.

ACCT 785. Dissertation I/Applied Research I (6)  This course is an independent application of research, design, and methods that leads to the completion of an original research study under the guidance of the student's doctoral committee. Throughout the development, implementation, and evaluation of the dissertation project, the student should meet regularly with his/her dissertation chair. As necessary, the student should also meet with other members of his/her committee to review specific portions of the proposal as appropriate to their expertise. Periodic revisions should be circulated to all members of the committee upon approval of the committee chair. Revisions should be noted in a cover memo to the committee members such that they will be kept up to date. When the study is completed and ready, final approval must be received, in writing, from the chair of the dissertation committee with agreement from all members of the committee. This process must be completed at least one month prior to the proposed date for the dissertation defense. With the designated approval, the defense date will then be scheduled.

ACCT 790. Dissertation II/Applied Research II (6; for preparing the submission and defense)  This course focuses on the last phase of the candidate's doctoral work. This is the last course before graduation. In this course, candidates will finalize all remaining degree requirements. Over the course of final semester, candidates will present and defend their research to their DBA dissertation committee, make any required changes to their dissertation, and gain full final approval of all committee members and applicable representatives of JU's academic units.

ACCT 795. Dissertation Extension (1; if needed)  This course will be a continuation of work on dissertation if not completed within the normal scope of the program.

ACCT 800. Special Topics (3)  A study of selected topics of major interest to doctoral candidates not covered in other course offerings. Topic for the semester will be indicated in advance, and the student may repeat the course once if the topic is different for a maximum of six hours.

DSIM 710. Advanced Statistics and  Applications (3)  This course introduces a variety of statistical procedures designed to enhance managerial decision making. Topics covered include tests of the mean, proportion, and variance with one or more samples, correlation, and both simple and multiple regression. Nonparametric statistical procedures will be discussed as well.  

DSIM 725. Quantitative Methods for Executive Decision Making (Quantitative Business Analytics I) (3)  This course will expose students to advanced quantitative and analytical skills designed to help candidates make well-informed, data-driven decisions while considering key objectives, alternatives, constraints, and uncertainty or risk. Students successfully completing this course will be better equipped to scope quantitative problem sets and be able to recognize when and where quantitative methods should be included in the decision making process. Topics will come from both deterministic and stochastic areas. The course provides tools that can be applied to executive decision-making from both aspects of management science.

DSIM 740. Business Analytics & Technological Tools (Quantitative Business Analytics II) (3)  QBA II will provide the students with analytical tools appropriate for doctoral level behavioral research necessary for use in fields such as marketing, management and strategy research. Topics will include Research Design and Implementation, Statistical Modeling Techniques, and Classification and Data Reduction Techniques. The focus of this course will be on the application of statistical software tools, such as AMOS,SPSS, etc., to research problems of managerial interest.

DSIM 755. Advanced Research Methods I (3)  The philosophy that guided the development of this course is twofold. First, academic research involves a process of activities rather than the application of isolated, unrelated concepts and ideas. Candidates in this course learn about how to conduct a review of current literature and scholarly work in topics they are interested in pursuing. Working closely with faculty, students learn strategies to get to problems worth researching (scope). The central premise of the course is training scholars to ask the right questions. Business research usually includes a hypothesis or question, hypothesis testing, data collection or field work, analysis, and recommendations or conclusions. Participants learn the sequence and flow of research activities and its central role in scholarly inquiry.

Second, the business scholar today requires a large toolbox or applications to gather evidence and analyze information. No longer can we, as business scholars, rely solely on surveys or secondary data to make recommendations. Business researchers, whether conducting research or reading research to self-inform, need to identify the key quantitative and qualitative drivers to business in order to decide what analysis is appropriate. Scoping the problem is the first step to making evidence-based decisions. A fundamental review of the most widely utilized research models and customer relationship  management tools will enable business decision makers with a deeper understanding of how the results of data inquiries impact business results today.

DSIM 775. Advanced Research Methods II (4)  See course description for DSIM 755 above. Advanced Research Methods II will be delivered as a directed individual study of dissertation development in which students will work directly with their dissertation chair.

DSIM 785. Dissertation I/Applied Research I (6)  This course is an independent application of research, design, and methods that leads to the completion of an original research study under the guidance of the student's doctoral committee. Throughout the development, implementation, and evaluation of the dissertation project, the student should meet regularly with his/her dissertation chair. As necessary, the student should also meet with other members of his/her committee to review specific portions of the proposal as appropriate to their expertise. Periodic revisions should be circulated to all members of the committee upon approval of the committee chair. Revisions should be noted in a cover memo to the committee members such that they will be kept up to date. When the study is completed and ready, final approval must be received, in writing, from the chair of the dissertation committee with agreement from all members of the committee. This process must be completed at least one month prior to the proposed date for the dissertation defense. With the designated approval, the defense date will then be scheduled.

DSIM 790. Dissertation II/Applied Research II (6; for preparing the submission and defense)  This course focuses on the last phase of the candidate's doctoral work. This is the last course before graduation. In this course, candidates will finalize all remaining degree requirements. Over the course of final semester, candidates will present and defend their research to their DBA dissertation committee, make any required changes to their dissertation, and gain full final approval of all committee members and applicable representatives of JU's academic units.

DSIM 795. Dissertation Extension (1; if needed)  This course will be a continuation of work on dissertation if not completed within the normal scope of the program.

DSIM 800. Special Topics (3)  A study of selected topics of major interest to doctoral candidates not covered in other course offerings. Topic for the semester will be indicated in advance, and the student may repeat the course once if the topic is different for a maximum of six hours.

ECON 770. Applied Econometrics (3)  In this class students will be introduced to various mathematical statistical tools for the analysis of business and economic data. Students will learn how to analyze data to extract simple relationships. Econometrics is the unification of business, economics, mathematics, and statistics. Econometrics adds empirical content to economic and business theory allowing current phenomenon to be analyzed and also allowing theories to be tested prior to being incorporated into the strategic framework or the economic plan.

ECON 785. Dissertation I/Applied Research I (6)  This course is an independent application of research, design, and methods that leads to the completion of an original research study under the guidance of the student's doctoral committee. Throughout the development, implementation, and evaluation of the dissertation project, the student should meet regularly with his/her dissertation chair. As necessary, the student should also meet with other members of his/her committee to review specific portions of the proposal as appropriate to their expertise. Periodic revisions should be circulated to all members of the committee upon approval of the committee chair. Revisions should be noted in a cover memo to the committee members such that they will be kept up to date. When the study is completed and ready, final approval must be received, in writing, from the chair of the dissertation committee with agreement from all members of the committee. This process must be completed at least one month prior to the proposed date for the dissertation defense. With the designated approval, the defense date will then be scheduled.

ECON 790. Dissertation II/Applied Research II (6; for preparing the submission and defense)  This course focuses on the last phase of the candidate's doctoral work. This is the last course before graduation. In this course, candidates will finalize all remaining degree requirements. Over the course of final semester, candidates will present and defend their research to their DBA dissertation committee, make any required changes to their dissertation, and gain full final approval of all committee members and applicable representatives of JU's academic units.

ECON 795. Dissertation Extension (1; if needed)  This course will be a continuation of work on dissertation if not completed within the normal scope of the program.

ECON 800. Special Topics (3)  A study of selected topics of major interest to doctoral candidates not covered in other course offerings. Topic for the semester will be indicated in advance, and the student may repeat the course once if the topic is different for a maximum of six hours.

FIN 750. Corporate Mergers, Acquisitions, and Valuations (3)  Corporate Mergers and Acquisitions (M&As) have become increasingly important among contemporary large corporations. Such mergers and acquisitions continue to grow as companies discover synergies, geographic strengths, or problems with organic growth in order to best leverage their assets. Companies create value by investing capital at rates of return that exceed their internal rate of return. This principle applies equally to manufacturing as it does in banking and finance. Measuring and managing assets is the central premise of this course. Companies thrive when they create positive economic returns for owners and shareholders. A major objective of the course is to clarify the field of valuation and the linkages between strategy and finance . The most widely used business models and case studies will be used as course materials to prepare future CEOs, business managers and financial advisors to be successful in these critical areas of business.

FIN 785. Dissertation I/Applied Research I (6)  This course is an independent application of research, design, and methods that leads to the completion of an original research study under the guidance of the student's doctoral committee. Throughout the development, implementation, and evaluation of the dissertation project, the student should meet regularly with his/her dissertation chair. As necessary, the student should also meet with other members of his/her committee to review specific portions of the proposal as appropriate to their expertise. Periodic revisions should be circulated to all members of the committee upon approval of the committee chair. Revisions should be noted in a cover memo to the committee members such that they will be kept up to date. When the study is completed and ready, final approval must be received, in writing, from the chair of the dissertation committee with agreement from all members of the committee. This process must be completed at least one month prior to the proposed date for the dissertation defense. With the designated approval, the defense date will then be scheduled.

FIN 790. Dissertation II/Applied Research II (6; for preparing the submission and defense)  This course focuses on the last phase of the candidate's doctoral work. This is the last course before graduation. In this course, candidates will finalize all remaining degree requirements. Over the course of final semester, candidates will present and defend their research to their DBA dissertation committee, make any required changes to their dissertation, and gain full final approval of all committee members and applicable representatives of JU's academic units.

FIN 795. Dissertation Extension (1; if needed)  This course will be a continuation of work on dissertation if not completed within the normal scope of the program.

FIN 800. Special Topics (3)  A study of selected topics of major interest to doctoral candidates not covered in other course offerings. Topic for the semester will be indicated in advance, and the student may repeat the course once if the topic is different for a maximum of six hours.

INB 700. Corporate and Global Strategy (3)  This course covers the theory and practice of building and implementing strategies for gaining competitive advantage in the global business environment. Emphasis is placed on weighing the risks and rewards of different feasible courses of action by thinking through the chain of cause and effect of each alternative. Students will master the theoretical body of knowledge in strategic management as it applies to international business (this includes concepts from classical strategic thinkers and contemporary strategists, e.g., Mintzberg, Prahalad). Students will acclimate their minds to critical analysis as they apply theoretical strategic concepts to actual cases in today's dynamic and challenging international environment. Students will develop a deep understanding of the four major interconnecting levels of corporate  policy, strategy, operations and tactics. Also, they will appreciate the critical role in strategic thinking of phenomena such as paradigm shifts, risk management, innovation, as well as relevant strategic military corollaries of war. Concepts taught at the MBA level will be extended so that net assessments will include the intangibles such as a competitor's genius and his (her) will to win. Lastly, students will gain a capital appreciation that strategic thinking is of utmost importance and is highly relevant to success in modern business. 

INB 745. Global Business in the Transnational Marketplace (3)  This seminar explores globalization - the shift toward a more integrated and interdependent global economic system - and examines global business issues and the forces that determine the international competitiveness of a firm and industry. The focus will be on the global environment in which multinational companies operate. The course is designed to assist participants in (a) gaining a better understanding of how the world economy works and of what in the world is going on right now, (b) developing multicultural attitudes and analytical skills to evaluate potential international markets, (c) developing global marketing and operation strategies, and (d) conducting in-depth analysis of multinational companies' internationalization by applying substantive knowledge to the international transaction and/or expansion situations. The course  will utilize the "global mindset" framework to underline international strategies and developing key global strategies to lead effectively in a highly interconnected global environment. A simulated aspect of this course is the incorporation of various current topics from the popular business press/media (Wall Street Journal, The Economist, Business Week, Fortune, NY Times, CNN, NPR, PBS, Global Marketplace, etc.)

INB 765. Marketing with a Global Mindset (3)  This course explores the theory, research and practice relating to global marketing management through a focus on current research in the field of marketing. The course covers theories of marketing as they apply  to global marketing strategy, global marketing management, global innovation, supply chains, and consumer behavior. Topics include the theoretical foundations of global marketing, company readiness, country attractiveness, foreign entry modes, local marketing and global marketing management. In Marketing with a Global Mindset, it is expected that students will: achieve a broad awareness of the various issues that constitute the field of marketing and an integrative understanding of their relationships, apply theoretical perspectives to the description and analysis of contemporary marketing issues, and develop abilities to design and conduct empirical marketing research that is reflective of the student's primary interest area. 

INB 785. Dissertation I/Applied Research I (6)  This course is an independent application of research, design, and methods that leads to the completion of an original research study under the guidance of the student's doctoral committee. Throughout the development, implementation, and evaluation of the dissertation project, the student should meet regularly with his/her dissertation chair. As necessary, the student should also meet with other members of his/her committee to review specific portions of the proposal as appropriate to their expertise. Periodic revisions should be circulated to all members of the committee upon approval of the committee chair. Revisions should be noted in a cover memo to the committee members such that they will be kept up to date. When the study is completed and ready, final approval must be received, in writing, from the chair of the dissertation committee with agreement from all members of the committee. This process must be completed at least one month prior to the proposed date for the dissertation defense. With the designated approval, the defense date will then be scheduled.

INB 790. Dissertation II/Applied Research II (6; for preparing the submission and defense)  This course focuses on the last phase of the candidate's doctoral work. This is the last course before graduation. In this course, candidates will finalize all remaining degree requirements. Over the course of final semester, candidates will present and defend their research to their DBA dissertation committee, make any required changes to their dissertation, and gain full final approval of all committee members and applicable representatives of JU's academic units.

INB 795. Dissertation Extension (1; if needed)  This course will be a continuation of work on dissertation if not completed within the normal scope of the program.

INB 800. Special Topics (3)  A study of selected topics of major interest to doctoral candidates not covered in other course offerings. Topic for the semester will be indicated in advance, and the student may repeat the course once if the topic is different for a maximum of six hours. 

MGT 705. Intrapreneurism & Entrepreneurial Thought Leadership (3)  This course approaches "managing the entrepreneurial mindset and innovation process" through four levels of analysis: individual, team, network, and organizational. At each level of analysis, particular attention is given to the conditions under which innovation or entrepreneurial initiatives are likely to succeed or fail. The course materials consist of a mixture of guest speakers, journal articles, and case studies, plus an online forum for further discussion of the guest speakers or required readings. The primary goal of the course is to expose students to a variety of perspectives on the entrepreneurial spirit, innovation-rich cultures, and learning from past failures or market tests for opportunities in the future.

MGT 715. Organizational Development, Transformation and Change (3)  Organizations must constantly evolve in order to endure and thrive in the current business environment and are increasingly aware that the best ideas for change come from multiple sources. They need team leaders, managers and professionals at every level who can initiate, implement and manage change. In this seminar students will gain the skills and confidence to: 1) Manage change at the company, departmental or individual level, 2) Be a change advocate, rallying support for ideas and implementation, 3) Create and lead teams that are resilient in the face of change, 4) Build competitive advantages and inspire others to do the same. This seminar explores and extrapolates theories, paradigm and principles of change , growth, learning, development, transition and transformation as essential parts of human dynamics in organizational systems. It seeks to help students understand the implications and impact of the multiple roles of a "change person" and enable individuals, as leaders, to engage in systemic, creative, and practical thinking processes and assessments in order to better understand themselves as an instrument of change. Seminal research articles with significant practical applications and other contemporary readings will be used to deliver content in this class.

MGT 720. Advanced Negotiations & Executive Communications (3)  Negotiation is a strong conflict resolution skill that professionals apply to countless situations throughout their careers. By improving negotiation skills, executives can quickly distinguish themselves as true leaders. True leaders need to read their audience rather than talk down to subordinates when meeting one-on-one, in group settings or speaking  to diverse audiences. This course prepares executives to negotiate and communicate on the highest levels with confidence.

MGT 730. DBA Colloquium I (1)  First year DBA candidates participate in a doctoral level colloquium featuring faculty researchers, guest scholars, visiting executives sharing various business research and issues. The colloquium provides a forum for first year students to meet and associate with third year students as graduating students present their own research.

MGT 735. Contemporary Business Ethics (3)  This course discusses the nature and significance of ethical standards and identifies four kinds of moral principles for resolving ethical dilemmas in business. It then encourages candidates to apply the resulting theory to specific issues such as the ethics of markets and prices (free markets, Marxist criticisms, the mixed economy, various forms of competition); environmental and consumer issues (pollution, depletable resources, conservation, consumer protection, advertising ethics); and employee issues (job discrimination, employee rights and obligations, affirmative action, a firm's duties to its ​employees). The course aims to 1) introduce ethical concepts that are relevant to resolving moral issues in business, 2) develop the reasoning and analytical skills needed to apply ethical concepts to business decisions, 3) identify the moral issues involved in the management of specific problem areas in business, and 4) examine the social and natural environments within which moral issues in business arise. The fundamentals of ethical reasoning and influence of culture (national and organizational) on ethical frameworks will be emphasized, in order to enhance candidates understanding and ability to manage the ethical climate in organizations. Topics covered include ethics and business, ethical principles in business, the business system, ethics in the marketplace, ethics and the environment, the ethics of consumer production and marketing, the ethics of job discrimination, and the individual in the organization. This course should be of benefit to anyone in business.

MGT 780. DBA Colloquium II (1)  Third year DBA candidates participate in a doctoral level colloquium featuring faculty researchers, guest scholars, visiting executives sharing various business research and issues. The colloquium provides a forum for third year students as graduating students to present their own research and mentor first year candidates.

MGT 785. Dissertation I/Applied Research I (6)  This course is an independent application of research, design, and methods that leads to the completion of an original research study under the guidance of the student's doctoral committee. Throughout the development, implementation, and evaluation of the dissertation project, the student should meet regularly with his/her dissertation chair. As necessary, the student should also meet with other members of his/her committee to review specific portions of the proposal as appropriate to their expertise. Periodic revisions should be circulated to all members of the committee upon approval of the committee chair. Revisions should be noted in a cover memo to the committee members such that they will be kept up to date. When the study is completed and ready, final approval must be received, in writing, from the chair of the dissertation committee with agreement from all members of the committee. This process must be completed at least one month prior to the proposed date for the dissertation defense. With the designated approval, the defense date will then be scheduled. 

MGT 790. Dissertation II/Applied Research II (6; for preparing the submission and defense)  This course focuses on the last phase of the candidate's doctoral work. This is the last course before graduation. In this course, candidates will finalize all remaining degree requirements. Over the course of final semester, candidates will present and defend their research to their DBA dissertation committee, make any required changes to their dissertation, and gain full final approval of all committee members and applicable representatives of JU's academic units.

MGT 795. Dissertation Extension (1; if needed)  This course will be a continuation of work on dissertation if not completed within the normal scope of the program.

MGT 800. Special Topics (1-6; max. 6)  A study of selected topics of major interest to doctoral candidates not covered in other course offerings. Topic for the semester will be indicated in advance, and the student may repeat the course once if the topic is different for a maximum of six hours.

MKG 785. Dissertation I/Applied Research I (6)  This course is an independent application of research, design, and methods that leads to the completion of an original research study under the guidance of the student's doctoral committee. Throughout the development, implementation, and evaluation of the dissertation project, the student should meet regularly with his/her dissertation chair. As necessary, the student should also meet with other members of his/her committee to review specific portions of the proposal as appropriate to their expertise. Periodic revisions should be circulated to all members of the committee upon approval of the committee chair. Revisions should be noted in a cover memo to the committee members such that they will be kept up to date. When the study is completed and ready, final approval must be received, in writing, from the chair of the dissertation committee with agreement from all members of the committee. This process must be completed at least one month prior to the proposed date for the dissertation defense. With the designated approval, the defense date will then be scheduled.

MKG 790. Dissertation II/Applied Research II (6; for preparing the submission and defense)  This course focuses on the last phase of the candidate's doctoral work. This is the last course before graduation. In this course, candidates will finalize all remaining degree requirements. Over the course of final semester, candidates will present and defend their research to their DBA dissertation committee, make any required changes to their dissertation, and gain full final approval of all committee members and applicable representatives of JU's academic units.

MKG 795. Dissertation Extension (1; if needed)  This course will be a continuation of work on dissertation if not completed within the normal scope of the program.

MKG 800. Special Topics (3)  A study of selected topics of major interest to doctoral candidates not covered in other course offerings. Topic for the semester will be indicated in advance, and the student may repeat the course once if the topic is different for a maximum of six hours.