ACCOUNTING COURSES



ACCT 100. Introduction to Accounting (3)
Three hours per week. ACCT 100 cannot be taken for academic credit after academic credit has been received for ACCT 201 and ACCT 202. An introductory financial accounting course in the use, interpretation, and analysis of published financial statements as used by management, creditors, investors and government agencies.


ACCT 201. Principles of Accounting I (3; F/S)

Three hours per week. A “C” or better must be earned in ACCT 201 and in ACCT 202 as a prerequisite for all upper-level accounting courses except ACCT 310. In addition, a “C” (2.0) or better is required in order to use this course as part of the core requirement for any business major. An introduction to the use of accounting information and to the language of business as found in reports and financial statements as a basis for measuring performances and making business decisions. Topics covered include accounting for receivables, inventories, long-term assets, and stockholders' equity.

ACCT 202. Principles of Accounting II (3; F/S)
Three hours per week. Prerequisite: ACCT 201 and MATH 112 or MATH 140 with a "C" or better in the Math course. A “C” or better must be earned in ACCT 201 and in ACCT 202 as a prerequisite for all upper-level accounting courses except ACCT 310. In addition, a “C” (2.0) or better is required in order to use this course as part of the core requirement for any business major. Managerial accounting topics include job order costing systems, cost behavior analysis, cost-volume-profit analysis, budgeting, standard costs, differential analysis and variable costing. A spreadsheet project must be satisfactorily completed to pass this course.

ACCT/FIN 305. Financial Statement Analysis (3; F)
Cross-listed with FIN 305. Three hours per week. Prerequisite: FIN 301. This course is an in-depth analysis of financial statements and the accounting principles that underlie their preparation. Topics include the process of income determination, liability recognition and asset valuation, along with financial ratio analysis and pro-forma financial statement preparation. Case analysis approach is used in addition to readings and problems. This course assumes a good background in financial accounting and in the principles of finance.  Credit cannot be awarded for both ACCT 305 and FIN 305.

ACCT 310. Managerial Accounting I (3;S)
Three hours per week. Prerequisite: ACCT 202. A study of the managerial uses of accounting data. Topics include cost behavioral patterns, budgets and short-term profit planning tools, decentralized control reporting, pricing and relevant costs, capital budgeting, and microcomputer applications. Students majoring in accounting cannot take this course for academic credit.

ACCT 311. Intermediate Accounting I (3; F)
Three hours per week. Prerequisite: A “C” or better in ACCT 201 and ACCT 202. A detailed, intensive study of generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) that relate to financial statement preparation, including analysis of cash, receivables, inventories, plant assets, intangible assets and current liabilities.

ACCT 312. Intermediate Accounting II (3; S)
Three hours per week. Prerequisite: ACCT 311 with a “C” or better. A continuation of ACCT 311, including problems that relate to long-term liabilities, owners equity, investments, taxes, pensions, leases and the statement of cash flows.

ACCT 314. Cost-Based Decision Making (3; S)
Three hours per week. Prerequisite: A “C” or better in ACCT 201 and ACCT 202. A study of cost accounting as a quantitative device for aiding management through analysis of cost behavior, cost-volume-profit relationships, standards costs and budgets.

ACCT 315. Managerial & Cost Analysis (3)
Three hours per week. Prerequisites: ACCT 314 or ACCT 310. A detailed study of managerial accounting. Topics include budgets and short-term profit planning tools, pricing and relevant costs, and capital budgeting techniques.

ACCT 317. Fund Accounting (3)
Three hours per week. Prerequisite: ACCT 312. Budgetary and fund accounting as applied in various types of not-for-profit organizations.

ACCT 341. Federal Taxation I (3; F)
Three hours per week. Prerequisite: A “C” or better in ACCT 201 and ACCT 202. Methods of computing taxable income and preparation of returns for individuals as provided by federal law.

ACCT 342. Federal Taxation II (3)
Three hours per week. Prerequisite: ACCT 341. Methods and computations in the preparation of tax returns for corporations, partnerships, estates and trusts.

ACCT 350. Financial Reporting & Analysis (3)
Three hours per week. Prerequisite: ECON 201. This course can only be taken by students in the Accelerated Degree Program who are seeking a BS in Business Development and Leadership. In this course students will gain an understanding of how a firm’s primary financial statements are prepared and analyzed. Students will learn how earnings are calculated and how assets, liabilities and owner’s equity are valued. This course will also cover how accounting information is used by management for decision making. These managerial topics include the determination of product costs, budgeting and incentive structures.

ACCT 370. Accounting Information Systems (3, S)
Three hours per week. Prerequisite: A “C” or better in ACCT 201 and ACCT 202. The purpose of this course is to explore the relationship among accounting, data, and technology as they combine to form accounting information. The course is not designed to focus on computer hardware issues, nor is it intended to explore the complexities of intermediate accounting. Yet a working knowledge of the principles of accounting is required. This course will examine the role that accounting information plays in the organizational decision making process.

ACCT 450. Advanced Accounting I (3; F)
Three hours per week. Prerequisite: ACCT 311 with a "C" or better. Advanced financial accounting problems that relate to full disclosures, segment and interim reporting, branches and segments, foreign currency, partnerships and an overview of governmental and not-for-profit accounting.

ACCT 451. Advanced Accounting II (3)
Three hours per week. Prerequisite: ACCT 450. Continuation of ACCT 450. Emphasizing problems that relate to business combinations, consolidation and mergers.

ACCT 453. Auditing (3; F)
Three hours per week. Prerequisite: ACCT 311 with a “C” or better. The objectives, procedures, and methods of public auditing, working papers, verification of accounts, auditor’s certificates, reports and ethical standards.

ACCT 480. Special Topics in Accounting (3)
Three hours per week. Prerequisites: ACCT 312 and consent of instructor. May repeat the course one time, maximum credit of six hours, so long as the topic is different. A study of selected topics of major interest in accounting not covered in other course offerings. The topics for the semester will be indicated in advance.

ACCT 490. Internship in Accounting (var. 1-6)
Prerequisites: Junior or an overall GPA 2.5 or better, and 2.5 or better in the major. For additional information, see the introduction to the Davis College of Business section in this catalog.

ACCT 500. Essentials of Accounting (2; F)
Designed specifically for MBA students needing an accounting prerequisite for graduate course work, this is an accelerated, 8-week MBA foundation course in financial accounting covering the preparation and understanding of a firm's financial statements, including how earnings are calculated; how assets, liabilities and stockholder's equity are valued; and how accrual basis relates to the cash basis of accounting.

ACCT 515. Assessing Financial Performance (3)
Offered in the Executive MBA Program only. The primary function of financial accounting is the reporting of financial information to external stakeholders of the firm such as stockholders, bondholders and bankers. In this course focus is placed on the collection, organization and analysis of financial accounting information. Included are the preparation and analysis of financial statements such as the income statement, balance sheet and the statement of cash flows.

ACCT 516. Managerial Accounting for Executives (2)
Offered in the Executive MBA Program only. In this course students develop the financial information necessary for a company’s internal users. Students will become grounded in the concepts and use of managerial accounting for planning, controlling and decision making. Included is the design of Excel models for the analysis of cost and profit structures, break-even analysis, modeling of activity based costs, make or buy decisions and the impact of performance metrics on decision making.

ACCT 522. Accounting for Managerial Control (3)
Students gain an understanding of management accounting and the use of financial information by managers to make strategic, organizational, and operational decisions. Focus is on the development and analysis of financial information for making relevant decisions, including the design of models and frameworks for the analysis of cost structures, break-even scenarios, make or buy decisions, and performance measurement designed to assure high performance.

ACCT 587. Special Topics in Accounting (var. 1-3)
A study of selected topics of major interest in Accounting not covered in other course offerings. May be taken for credit more than once, if different topic.

ACCT 590. Internship for Curricular Practical Training (1-3, max. 6)
This for-credit internship experience provides a practical application of principle and theory in an actual business setting through an internship opportunity. Students carry out a work project in a private or public sector organization under the direct supervision of a designated faculty member and executive. This may be part-time or full-time practical work experience in the student's field of study. The internship may be located at an on or off-campus facility. Internship may not be taken until the student has completed at least one semester of enrollment in the graduate program. Open to all graduate students, including international graduate students (Master/Doctoral).

ACCT 592. Independent Studies in Accounting (var. 1-3, max. 3)
A study of related Accounting topics that is closely supervised by a faculty member. Activities will normally be conducted by students out of the classroom with periodic meetings and evaluation by the faculty member who is mentoring a project. May be taken for credit more than once, but only 3 credit hours will be counted toward satisfying the degree requirements.

ACCT 620. Advanced Managerial Accounting (3)
Prerequisites: ACCT 522 or permission of the Accounting and Finance Chair. In this course the focus is on the development of financial information necessary for decision making. Topics include budget analysis, profit planning tools, performance measurement, pricing and relevant costs, capital budgeting and strategic management. Undergraduate students will be able to take this course with the permission of the Accounting and Finance Chair.

ACCT 630. Advanced Tax Accounting (3)
Prerequisites: ACCT 522 or permission of the Accounting and Finance Chair. In this course students will learn the tax methods, computations, and theory necessary for the preparation and analysis of the tax returns of corporations, partnerships, estates and trusts. Undergraduate students will be able to take this course with the permission of the Accounting and Finance Chair.

ACCT/FIN 640. Analyzing Financial Performance (3; S)
Cross listed with FIN 640. Prerequisite: ACCT 522 and FIN 534, or permission of the Accounting and Finance Chair. Students will critically analyze financial statements with an emphasis on identifying items that may indicate unrecognized value, undisclosed or inadequate disclosure of problems, and aggressive accounting. Classes will primarily use case studies with an emphasis on current events. Students will conduct a detailed company examination and prepare a report using public information such as annual reports, 10-Ks, 10-Qs and other SEC filings. Although not a prerequisite, it is highly recommended that a student have as a background a course in Intermediate Accounting or equivalent work experience. Credit cannot be awarded for both ACCT 640 and FIN 640.

ACCT/FIN 650. Advanced Managerial Accounting & Financial Modeling (3; F)
Cross listed with FIN 650. Prerequisites: ACCT 522 or permission of the Accounting and Finance Chair. Students will design financial models to facilitate strategic decision-making. The modeling process will allow students to analyze a wide range of financial issues and incorporate the notion of risk in strategic decisions. Major topics include activity based costing, capital project analysis, investment analysis, performance evaluation, product mix decisions and valuation techniques. Credit cannot be awarded for both ACCT 650 and FIN 650.

ACCT/FIN 660. Enterprise Risk Management (3; S)
Cross listed with FIN 660. Prerequisites: ACCT 522 and FIN 534, or permission of the Accounting and Finance Chair. Students will acquire the concepts and techniques available to corporations, non-profit organizations and other organizations to manage enterprise risks, including risk assumption, prevention, diversification, and transfer via insurance and non-insurance market mechanisms. The costs associated with such risks as product liability, environmental impairments, property losses, work-related injuries, and employee benefits (e.g., pensions, health insurance, etc.) affect the daily management of all organizations. Likewise, a fall in demand for its product, a sudden rise in production or financing costs, or a technological failure or destruction of information, can impair the value of the enterprise. Managers who make decisions without appropriate consideration of risk management issues can jeopardize the long-term survival of their organizations. Credit cannot be awarded for both ACCT 660 and FIN 660.

ACCT 670. Ethics & Government in Accounting (3)
This course is designed to help students deal with the ethical implications created in an increasingly complex business world, especially in the field of accounting. It includes methods for analyzing one's own personal values and recognizing organizational governance and environmental forces that influence ethical behavior. Students will recognize ethical issues and engage in effective moral debate in a business setting. A combination of case analyses, research paper, exams and classroom discussion are used.

ACCT/FIN 680. Financial Decision-making (3)
Cross listed with FIN 680. Prerequisites: ACCT 522 and FIN 534, or permission of the Accounting and Finance Chair. This course will focus on the development of financial information necessary for business decision-making. Topics include financial statement analysis, financial performance  metrics, cost-volume-profit and marginal analysis, investment risk and portfolio management, and investment decisions necessary for effective internal managerial accounting. Students will be prepared to successfully pass the Certified Management Accounting (CMA) Part 2 Exam (of the two-part CMA exam) upon completion of the is course. Credit cannot be awarded for both ACCT 680 and FIN 680.

ACCT 760. Advanced Managerial Accounting (3)
In this class students will review financial system basics and various other metrics necessary for an eclectic view of identifying and solving business problems and finding opportunity. In this class students will be introduced to concepts that straddle the accounting/finance/marketing boundary such as feature-set, targeting, and segmentation. The class will move quickly into modeling financial/marketing issues and problem-solving with tools like optimization and simulation. Included will be an introduction to Monte Carlo Simulation using Crystal Ball (Oracle), and VBA for Financial Modeling & Data Analytics.

ACCT 785. Dissertation I/Applied Research I (6)
This course is an independent application of research, design, and methods that leads to the completion of an original research study under the guidance of the student's doctoral committee. Throughout the development, implementation, and evaluation of the dissertation project, the student should meet regularly with his/her dissertation chair. As necessary, the student should also meet with other members of his/her committee to review specific portions of the proposal as appropriate to their expertise. Periodic revisions should be circulated to all members of the committee upon approval of the committee chair. Revisions should be noted in a cover memo to the committee members such that they will be kept up to date. When the study is completed and ready, final approval must be received, in writing, from the chair of the dissertation committee with agreement from all members of the committee. This process must be completed at least one month prior to the proposed date for the dissertation defense. With the designated approval, the defense date will then be scheduled.

ACCT 790. Dissertation II/Applied Research II (6; for preparing the submission and defense)
This course focuses on the last phase of the candidate's doctoral work. This is the last course before graduation. In this course, candidates will finalize all remaining degree requirements. Over the course of final semester, candidates will present and defend their research to their DBA dissertation committee, make any required changes to their dissertation, and gain full final approval of all committee members and applicable representatives of JU's academic units.

ACCT 795. Dissertation Extension (1; if needed)
This course will be a continuation of work on dissertation if not completed within the normal scope of the program.

ACCT 800. Special Topics (3)
A study of selected topics of major interest to doctoral candidates not covered in other course offerings. Topic for the semester will be indicated in advance, and the student may repeat the course once if the topic is different for a maximum of six hours.