ENGL 100N. Basic English (3; non-degree credit; F, S)
Three hours per week. May not be repeated. A diagnostic and prescriptive course in basic grammar and writing skills through intensive work on grammar, mechanics, sentences, paragraphs, and brief essays. This course cannot be used to replace University requirements, major requirements, or count in the 120 semester hours required for graduation. However, students who gain exemption scores on both departmental proficiency exam and essay will receive three semester hours degree credit for ENGL 101.

ENGL 101.  Elements of Composition. (3; F, S)
Three hours per week. An emphasis on the principles of writing and an introduction to the reading of college-level prose. Students will be required to pass a standardized departmental examination and write an acceptable essay at the end of the term. Students who gain exemption scores on both departmental proficiency exam and essay will receive three semester hours degree credit for ENGL 101.

ENGL 103.  Introductory Writing (3; F, S)
Three hours per week. A student must earn at least a “C-” or the course must be repeated. This course must be completed within the student’s first year of study. ENGL 103 focuses on the development of skills necessary for reading analytically and writing clear, accurate, coherent expository prose. It also introduces students to basic research skills, library resources, and documentation systems. Students who pass ENGL 103 but do not pass the ENGL 103 Exit Exam are required to enroll in ENGL 214 prior to reaching 60 credit hours, and must pass ENGL 214 in order to graduate.

  • Students who earn a 3 on either the AP Language and Composition or the AP Literature and Language exams are placed into ENGL 103 Honors. Students who earn a 4 or 5 on the AP Language and Composition exam are awarded credit for ENGL 103 and are placed into ENGL 203 Honors. Students who earn a 4 or 5 on the AP Literature and Language exam are awarded 3 hours of English elective credit and are placed into ENGL 103 Honors.

ENGL 199. Special Topics in Language, Literature & Film (1-3) 
One to three hours per week. May be repeated for credit when the topic has changed. Topics might include literature and popular culture, basic grammar and vocabulary development, the Bible as literature, fantasy and science fiction.

ENGL 202. The American Literary Experience (3)
Three hours per week. A survey of American literature from the Puritans to the present, emphasizing major authors and identifying themes common to different historical periods. Includes a variety of critical approaches.

ENGL 203. World Literature (3; F, S)
Three hours per week. Prerequisites: Students must have passed ENGL 103 with a "C-" or better in order to enroll in ENGL 203. Students may simultaneously be enrolled in ENGL 214 while they take ENGL 203. A survey of selected masterpieces, translated into English, which have influenced the evolution of various world cultures over several centuries. Forms studied might include the epic, the lyric poem, the short story, the essay, and the novel, and include such works as Gilgamesh, The Odyssey, The Ramayana, The Koran, Japanese Noh drama and African literatures. Course may also include a formal research paper, utilizing skills developed in ENGL 103. Students may not exempt ENGL 203 through AP exam scores.

ENGL 204. The British Literary Experience I (3)
Three hours per week. An introduction to British writers of major importance from the Beowulf poet to the pre-Romantics. Includes a variety of critical approaches.

ENGL 206. The British Literary Experience II (3)
Three hours per week. An introduction to major literary movements and writers, from Wordsworth and Coleridge to the present. Includes a variety of critical approaches.

ENGL 210. Elements of Film (3)
Three hours per week. From its inception in the nickelodeons and silents in the last decade of the nineteenth century, the motion picture has grown into perhaps the most vital and popular art form of the modern era. This course will trace the growth and development of the movies over the past century, focusing on technological advances, thematic breakthroughs, evolving genres and major figures.

ENGL 212. Special Topics in Language, Literature & Film (3)
Three hours per week. May be repeated for credit when the topic has changed. Topics might include literature and popular culture, basic grammar and vocabulary development, the Bible as literature, fantasy and science fiction.

ENGL 214. Research Writing in the Disciplines (3; F, S)
Three hours per week. Prerequisite: Students must have taken and passed ENGL 103 with a "C-" or better. Course will further develop research writing skills with an emphasis on writing across the curriculum. Special focus on argumentative writing, thesis development, analysis, and discipline-appropriate conventions of organization, structure, and language; also focuses on using source material, summarizing, quoting, using in-text citation, using documentation systems, grammar and mechanics. Open to students in any major at any point in their studies; however, students who pass ENGL 103 but do not pass the ENGL 103 proficiency exam are required to enroll in ENGL 214 prior to reaching 60 credit hours, and must pass ENGL 214 in order to graduate. May be taken simultaneously with ENGL 203.

ENGL 302WI. Writing: Exposition (3)
Three hours per week. Enrollment limited to 15 students. Intensive study and practice in the methods used in exposition, that is, writing which sets forth or explains the nature of an idea, object or theme.

ENGL 304WI. Writing: Argumentation (3)
Three hours per week. Enrollment limited to 15 students. Intensive study and practice in the methods used in argumentation, that is, the attempt to influence a reader by establishing the truth or falsity of a proposition.

ENGL 306WI. Creative Writing (3)
Three hours per week. May be repeated with permission of instructor for credit, depending on the extensiveness and nature of the project. Enrollment limited to 15 students. Critical guidance for students who are interested in producing original, imaginative prose or poetry.

ENGL 310. Studies in Film (3)
Three hours per week. May be repeated for credit when the topic has changed. Topics might include film genres, specific directors, film and psychology, film and politics.

ENGL 316. Readings in Drama (3)
Three hours per week. May be repeated for credit when the topic has changed. Topics and approaches will vary from year to year. The course may present a traditional survey (e.g., the development of drama from classical Greek times to its flowering in Elizabethan England, or from the Restoration to the present), focus on a particular historical period or theme (e.g., the avant-garde and contemporary drama), or examine the elements of drama in a way that cuts across historical and thematic lines.

ENGL 318. Readings in Poetry (3)
Three hours per week. May be repeated for credit when the topic has changed. Topics and approaches will vary from year to year and may range from an examination of the elements of poetry, as employed by master poets, to a study of particular poetic forms, such as the sonnet or lyric.

ENGL 320. Readings in the Novel (3)
Three hours per week. May be repeated for credit when the topic has changed. Topics and approaches will vary from year to year. The course may present a traditional survey of representative British novelists (Defoe to Austen, Bronte to Conrad), focus on a particular historical period or theme, or examine the elements of the novel in a way that cuts across historical and thematic lines.

ENGL 324. Early and Medieval British Literature (3)
Three hours per week. A study of representative works in their original language from England’s first literary period, beginning with Beowulf and continuing through selected works of Chaucer.

ENGL 326. Renaissance Literature (3)
Three hours per week. A study of the poetry, prose, and drama of the Elizabethan Age and seventeenth century. Likely to be discussed are such authors as Spenser, Sidney, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Donne and Milton.

ENGL328. Restoration & 18th Century British Literature (3) 
Three hours per week. A study of selected British prose and poetry from 1660 to 1800, with special emphasis on such authors as Dryden, Swift, Pope, Johnson and members of their social and artistic circles.

ENGL 330. 19th-Century British Literature (3)
Three hours per week. A critical overview of nineteenth century prose and poetry, from the rebellious romantic movement and its chief proponents – including Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats and the Brontes – to the rise, triumph and fall of the Victorian age as seen in the works of Carlyle, Browning, Arnold, Tennyson, Dickens and George Eliot, among others.

ENGL 332. Modern British Literature (3)
Three hours per week. A survey of the major forces in modern British prose and poetry, beginning with Hardy and Yeats and continuing through Woolf, Joyce, Lawrence, Auden and mid-century authors.

ENGL 338. 19th-Century American Literature (3)
Three hours per week. An examination of American prose and poetry from the pre-Civil War romantics to the realists and naturalists who responded in varying ways to the industrial spirit of late-nineteenth and early twentieth century America. Likely to be included are such writers as Emerson, Hawthorne, Poe, Melville, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, Crane, Chopin, Dreiser and Henry James.

ENGL 340. Modern American Literature (3)
Three hours per week. Major American writers of fiction and poetry from about 1910 to the mid-twentieth century, with special emphasis on T.S. Eliot, Pound, Williams, Stevens, Anderson, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner and Wright, among others.

ENGL 342. Contemporary Literature (3)
Three hours per week. May be repeated for credit when the topic has changed. A study of British, American, and other English literature of the last two or three decades, considering international influences and the rise of postmodernism; the course may concentrate on a single topic, such as the recent British novel, Australian poetry, or minority English literature in the United States.

ENGL 378H. Special Topics in Language, Literature & Film (3)
Three hours per week. May be repeated for credit when the topic has changed. Subjects might include a thematic approach to English and/or American literature, and examination of the relationship between literature and film, or an intensive study of a literary decade.

ENGL 400. Linguistics (3)
Three hours per week. An introduction to basic linguistic theory including semantics, pragmatics, syntax, morphology, and phonology, especially as these fields apply to the study of literature.

ENGL 402. English Grammar  (3)
Three hours per week. A survey of the history of the English language and grammar, drawing on traditional, structural and transformational generative methodologies.

ENGL 406WI. Advanced  Creative Writing  (3)
Three hours per week. Prerequisite: ENGL 306WI or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15 students. May be repeated with permission of instructor for credit, depending on the extensiveness and nature of the project. A continuation of ENGL 306WI.

ENGL 408. Shakespeare (3)
Three hours per week. A study of Shakespeare as poet and playwright; an examination of his plays in performance as well as in literary context. The plays chosen will vary from year to year but will usually include a mixture of early and late works through a sampling of comedies, histories and tragedies.

ENGL 410. Studies in Major British Authors (3)
Three hours per week. May be repeated for credit when the topic has changed.  An intensive examination of British writers of compelling interest. The course may focus on a single author, such as Chaucer, Milton or Blake, or compare the moral and social alternatives offered by several authors, such as George Eliot, Shaw and Lawrence.

ENGL 412. Studies in Major American Authors (3)
Three hours per week. May be repeated for credit when the topic has changed. An intensive examination of American writers of compelling interest. The course may focus on a single author, such as Henry James or Mark Twain, or compare the world-views of several authors, such as Melville and Faulkner.

ENGL 414. Studies in Language, Literature & Film (3)
Three hours per week. Topics, which will vary from year to year, might include a history of literary criticism, Southern literature, a history of the English language, and the comic tradition in literature and film. May be repeated for credit when the topic has changed.

ENGL 425. Gender & Literary Perspectives (3)
Three hours per week. May be repeated for credit when the topic has changed. May not be used to satisfy the writing intensive requirement. A study of roles, theories, and issues of gender and family roles featuring multicultural literary perspectives. Focus may be on one or more forms of expression, including fiction, drama, poetry, essays, films or nonfiction, and a variety of the most pertinent writing in related critical theory.

ENGL 432. Literature & Composition (3)
Three hours per week. The interrelatedness of the teaching of writing and the teaching of literature, including adolescent literature, with an emphasis on the composing process that unites these disciplines.

ENGL 490. Internship (max. 6)
Prerequisite: Junior or senior status. The student will work for a minimum of three hours per week for each hour of academic credit. These credit hours will not satisfy any requirements for an English major or minor. The internship must be arranged by a member of the English faculty and be approved by the Humanities Division Chair, as well as the organization providing the work. Opportunities for internships depend on the needs of local organizations and the availability of faculty members to coordinate student work.