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FERPA Information

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) (20 U.S.C. § 1232g; 34 CFR Part 99) is a Federal law that protects the privacy of student education records. The law applies to all schools that receive funds under an applicable program of the U.S. Department of Education. 

FERPA gives parents certain rights with respect to their children's education records. These rights transfer to the student when he or she reaches the age of 18 or attends a school beyond the high school level. Students to whom the rights have transferred are "eligible students." 

Parents or eligible students have the right to inspect and review the student's education records maintained by the school. Schools are not required to provide copies of records unless, for reasons such as great distance, it is impossible for parents or eligible students to review the records. Schools may charge a fee for copies.


Parents or eligible students have the right to request that a school correct records which they believe to be inaccurate or misleading. If the school decides not to amend the record, the parent or eligible student then has the right to a formal hearing. After the hearing, if the school still decides not to amend the record, the parent or eligible student has the right to place a statement with the record setting forth his or her view about the contested information.

Generally, schools must have written permission from the parent or eligible student in order to release any information from a student's education record. However, FERPA allows schools to disclose those records, without consent, to the following parties or under the following conditions (34 CFR § 99.31):

  • School officials with legitimate educational interest
  • Other schools to which a student is transferring
  • Specified officials for audit or evaluation purposes
  • Appropriate parties in connection with financial aid to a student
  • Organizations conducting certain studies for or on behalf of the school
  • Accrediting organizations
  • To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena
  • Appropriate officials in cases of health and safety emergencies
  • State and local authorities, within a juvenile justice system, pursuant to specific state law.

Schools may disclose, without consent, "directory" information such as a student's name, address, telephone number, date and place of birth, honors and awards, and dates of attendance. However, schools must tell parents and eligible students about directory information and allow parents and eligible students a reasonable amount of time to request that the school not disclose directory information about them. Schools must notify parents and eligible students annually of their rights under FERPA. The actual means of notification (special letter, inclusion in a PTA bulletin, student handbook, or newspaper article) is left to the discretion of each school.

For more information about FERPA, visit the United States Department of Education Web site.

Student Rights Under FERPA

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students at Jacksonville University certain rights with respect to their education records. These rights include:

a. The right to inspect and review the student's education records.

Students should submit to the Registrar, Dean, Department Chair, or other appropriate official, a written request that identifies the record(s) they wish to inspect. The University official will make arrangements for access within 45 days of the day the University receives a request for access, and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the University official to whom the request was submitted, that official shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed.

b. The right to request the amendment of the student's education records that the student believes is inaccurate or misleading.

Students may ask the University to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate or misleading. They should write the University official responsible for the record, clearly identifying the part of the record they want changed and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading.

If the University decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, the University will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.

c. The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student's education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosures without consent.

One exception that permits disclosure without consent, is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the University in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including Public Safety personnel and Student Health staff), a person or company with whom the University has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, collection agency, and the National Student Clearinghouse); a person serving on the Board of Directors; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks.

Generally, schools must have written permission from the student in order to release any information from a student's education record. However, FERPA allows schools to disclose those records, without consent, to the following parties or under the following conditions: school officials with legitimate educational interest; other schools to which a student is requesting transfer or enrollment; specified officials for audit or evaluation purposes; appropriate parties in connection with financial aid to a student; organizations conducting certain studies for or on behalf of the school; accrediting organizations; to comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena; appropriate officials in cases of health and safety emergencies

FERPA allows the University to disclose directory information without the written consent of the student. Directory information is information contained in an education record of a student which generally would not be considered harmful or an invasion of privacy if disclosed. Directory information includes the student's full name, the fact that the student is or has been enrolled full-time/part-time status, local and permanent address(es), e-mail address, telephone number(s), date and place of birth, dates of attendance, division (school or college), class, major field(s) of study and/or curriculum, degrees and awards received, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height of members of athletic teams, photograph, and previous educational agency or institution attended by the student.

A currently enrolled student may request any or all directory information not be released by contacting the Registrar’s Office. Such submission of this request shall be honored for the remainder of the term in which the request is filed, except that such restriction shall not apply to directory information already published or in the process of being published.

d. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by Jacksonville University to comply with requirements of FERPA.

The name and address of the office that administers FERPA are:

Family Policy Compliance Office

U.S. Department of Education

600 Independence Avenue, SW

Washington, DC 20202-4605

For more information about FERPA, visit the United States Department of Education Web site.